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A Fluff Piece On Fluff

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Last Saturday was the annual "What the Fluff?" festival in Somerville. If you're a New Englander than you probably know what fluff is (think: that marshmallowy sticky spread you can only get in this part of the country) and if you're an international visitor you're probably thinking what the fluff is fluff?!? I always found it amusing to ask non-U.S residents if they know what fluff is and then have them look back at me with a blank stare. If you've never eaten fluff before do yourself a favor : go out, buy some, and eat it on bread with peanut butter (aka a fluffernutter sandwich). You can thank me later.

So why does Somerville even have a festival to celebrate a marshmallow spread? Good question. It's because in 1917 a guy named Archibald Query invented fluff right there in Union Square. Every year the city hosts a festival, complete with musical performances, games, and street vendors, to celebrate this creation.

The festival this year, themed "Fluff U: A Sweet Education" included events like fluff covered musical chairs, fluff jousting, a fluff inspired cooking competition (during which winners were given honorary degrees from the Somerville Mayor, Joe Curtatone) and more. The festival was even MCed by an Archibald Query impersonator. Basically, the whole thing is an big excuse to have fun, be weird, and eat a lot of fluff (what more could you want in an event??)

If you couldn't make the festival this year, MC (fake) Archibald Query made it known that next year is the 100th anniversary of the creation of fluff and therefore the festival will be an even bigger celebration. So big that planning for the festival will begin as early as next month. So save the date! And maybe think up some creative fluff baking ideas...

For other quirky state food fairs check out this article from National Geographic travel!

Krazy for KitKats

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, September 27, 2016


I'm assuming you're familiar with the KitKat -- the milk chocolate and wafer bar you can find in just about every supermarket, gas station, and convenience store in the country. KitKat is definitely a popular chocolate in the U.S. but did you know that it is HUGE is Japan?? I had no idea until I read this article from CNN. The article is about the KitKat craze and why this chocolate is so popular in the country (it's a really interesting article so you should read it) We were so intrigued that we asked our Japanese culture consultant to give us some insight into this aspect of Japanese life.

To understand the KitKat craze in Japan it is important to understand the involvement of lucky charms in the culture. Belief in good luck charms and trinkets is strong in Japanese society. Japanese often keep a lucky charm, such as a coin, on their person during exams or important events so that they may have good fortune. KitKats became so popular because they are given as good luck charms. Why? Sort of by an unintentional coincidence. The candy's name sounds very similar to the Japanese phrase "kitto katsato", meaning "to surely win". Japanese students will receive KitKats from their parents or friends before exams as a way of saying good luck. Just how popular are KitKats?? In Japan they are sold in over 300 flavors - though not the kinds of flavors you would find in the U.S. Some notable KitKats include pumpkin pudding, green tea, shinshu apple, adzuki bean sandwhich. matcha, wasabi, purple sweet potatoes, cherry blossom, and sake (and to think I thought the white chocolate kind was adventurous). The reason for so many flavors is because of the large amount of competition within the Japanese candy business. Over 2,000 new confectionery products are released in the country each year, so KitKat must create new flavors to keep up. Colors also play a role in the creation of new flavors, as Japanese tend to prefer bright hues to ordinary ones. The different colored KitKats are more attractive to Japanese consumers than standard chocolates. KitKat in Japan goes beyond your standard chocolate bar, with products like KitKat pizza and "baking bars" designed to be cooked before eating. Since 2012m KitKat has begun to overtake major candy companies like Meji. 

KitKats are produced and displayed in Japan the way you might imagine gourmet chocolate is made here. In Japan, KitKats are sold in large stores, the way Lindt or Godiva chocolate is sold in the United States. However, despite their "gourmet" preparation, KitKats are still not viewed to be as fancy or classy like gourmet chocolate brands in America would be. For example, while it may be culturally appropriate in the U.S. to give a box of Godiva chocolates as say a housewarming gift or as an end of the year thank you to a professor, it would not be appropriate in Japan to give a KitKat as a gift in these same situations. So give a KitKat to your Japanese students before their test, but don't expect any from their parents if they come to visit. 


Did this post give you a KitKat craving?? Lucy for you, you don't have to go all the way to Japan for Matcha flavored KitKats. You can find them at most H Marts or Asian grocery stores. 

Little Italy's Big Feast

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, August 24, 2016

This Friday marks the start of the three day festival, Saint Anthony's Feast, in the North End. As you might know, the North End has feasts and festivals all summer long, but Saint Anthony's is definietly the biggest and also happens to be a personal favorite of mine. Last year I attended the feast with my family and celebrated my (37.5%) Italian-ness by eating a cannoli on Endicott street. Even if you aren't Italian, or a canoli -lover like me you'll definitely still enjoy the festival - but come on, who doesn't love cannolis??

The Feast is a very lively event, drawing huge crowds that cover the historic streets of the North End. Hundreds of food vendors line the sidewalks serving every Italian plate you could think of; from caprese salads, to sausages, to lasagna, to aranchini. Pizza, calzones, calamari, ceci, torrone, cookies, pastries, and more.  National Geographic wasn't kidding when they called it "The Feast of all Feasts". Once you're full of Italian cooking you can stroll the streets listening to live musical performances or watch the giant statue of Saint Anthony be carried through the streets in an even giant-er parade. Experience food and beverage tastings, dancing, games, and crafts for kids. 

The best part about the celebration is that a lot of North end restaurants that are typically crowded (think: Mikes Pasteries, Pizzeria Regina) have stands where you can get their famous food without waiting in an endless line. Did you say Mike's Pastries without a line??? I know right, unheard of. 

I also really like going to The Feast because the atmosphere is so upbeat and the crowd is so fun. Even though I'm only like (almost) half Italian, its nice to be around a group of people who are all part of a similar history and are celebrating a common heritage. Above everything, I enjoy being surrounded by others who share my love of c̶a̶r̶b̶s̶ ̶ Italian food. So, if this post has convinced you to go, then the only remaining tough choice is deciding what to eat. 

For a full schedule of the weekends events and a brief history of Saint Anthony's Feast click here. 

A Little Taste of the World

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Would you eat a pickle chip? What about an octopus chip? Would you try a whiskey and haggis chip? How about a Marmite chip? Why am I even asking about chips???? Well, National Geographic recently published an article about unusual potato chip flavors around the world which I thought was very interesting. The article is an interview with Ali Payne, the vice president of global snacks innovation at PepsiCo, who explains how cultural cravings affect potato chip flavor trends. She talks about how chip flavors reflect the components of the typical foods in each region and are therefore the best way to eat like a local when traveling. 

 In other words: potato chips make great souvenirs. 

If you're familiar with the Do Us a Flavor competition (aka the thing responsible for Chicken and Waffles Lay's) then you've probably seen some pretty crazy chip flavors on the shelves. According to Ali Payne, preferences for flavors in the program are usually similar to local comfort food - which explains flavors like garlic bread or southern biscuits and gravy in the U.S. and English Breakfast in the U.K.

The part of the article that I found really interesting though was about how globalization is affecting our food - or more specifically our chips. The article explains that since people are becoming more and more exposed to different flavor around the world from travel and social media, ingredients from other countries are gaining popularity.  "A flavor like wasabi and ginger, which may have once been considered exotic in the U.S., is now a hugely popular flavor thanks to the prevalence of Japanese cuisine, and Italian red meat is now one of the most popular flavors in China." 

I also learned from this article that the U.S. has the most flavor diversity of any country (which makes sense considering the whole melting pot thing) so I was inspired to go to a local grocery store and see for myself the range of flavors that the US potato chip market has to offer. What I gathered from looking at the aisles was that the US does in fact have a wide variety of chips...actually compared to the grocery stores that I've visited in Europe, we have a wide variety of everything. So, perhaps it is true that the food in our stores reflects the diversity of our nation. If anything, it definitely reflects our culture of consumerism. 


In looking at a survey done in 2015, it appears that although we have a diverse variety of odd flavors, the most popular flavors among Americans tend to be more conservative, reflecting typical American dishes and usual food flavorings. This is not surprising given the information in the article. People prefer the types of flavors that they have grown up eating, and for Americans this means flavors like plain and (of course) BBQ. 

Red, White, and Burger

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, July 20, 2016

In my travel experience, I have found that one of the best ways to learn about and experience a new culture is by trying the typical cuisine of that region or country. When traveling to the US, sampling the local food should definitely be on your "to do "list. If you're just visiting the United States you might be thinking : America has its own cuisine?? Yes, as much as we do love the food of other cultures ( ex: Mexican, Italian, Chinese) America has a few dishes that are classically American. To get you started, here is a list of a few USA favorites for Americans and tourists alike. 

What's the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about American food? The burger. A classic meal that originated in the 1800s right here in the good ol' U S of A. There is some debate as to who actually created the first hamburger but virtually no debate as to whether or not they're delicious. The popularity of the hamburger (no, not only in the US but all over the world) since its creation speaks for itself. My pick for a must try burger in Boston is Boston Burger Company on Boylston Street.When I went recently there was SO MANY different burgers on the menu it was difficult to decide on just one...but in the end I think I made the right choice (see picture above). They even have a burger topped with mozzarella sticks, fried mac and cheese, onion rings, bacon, and BBQ sauce. If that doesn't scream America then I don't know what does. 

 

The hot dog - commonly coupled with the burger- was created in the US thanks to German immigrants. While Coney Island is the original home of the hot dogs that we know and love today, Boston offers many worthwhile renditions of this American classic - and no I'm not referring to the $20 Franks at Fenway Park. Instead, I would opt for a real outdoor BBQ at Formaggio's Kitchen. Every Saturday from 11 am the restaurant hosts a BBQ outside of their Cambridge location with not only hot dogs but also smoked meat sandwiches, ribs and corn bread. The best part is Formaggio's hot dogs are all beef, not that mystery concoction of meats you sometimes find in grocery stores, so you don't have to feel bad post devouring one Saturday afternoon. Speaking of eating hot dogs on Saturdays...THIS Saturday (July 23rd) is National Hot Dog Day so go out and celebrate America's favorite cooked sausage.

A true meal is not complete without dessert, so in keeping with the spirit of all things American I urge you to try a slice of apple pie from Petsi Pies on Beacon Street in Somerville. All of the pies here are baked fresh daily with real ingredients, so you know they're good. The perfect addition to an American BBQ. I like to top mine off with Vanilla ice cream, but you can do what you want. 

Clam chowder may not be a typical dish of America in general, but it is definitely a typical dish of the New England region. There are A LOT of places in New England to get chowder, but my recommendation in the Boston area has to be the Barking Crab in Seaport. Here, the food is good and the atmosphere is even better. From the outdoor terrace you have a great view of the harbor making for an authentic New England experience.

Pair your meals with other uniquely American things, maybe? A NASCAR race? A football game? You don't even have to feel bad about eating all this food - consider it a learning experience. 

Treat Yo Self to Fresh Foods!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, July 06, 2016

Browsing around an open air market is a fun summer activity and a nice way to enjoy the good weather. Thankfully, Boston has a few options when it comes to farmers markets and finding foods that are (for the most part) actually good for you!  

Copley Square Farmers Market  

Located in the heart of back bay right by the Boston Public Library, the Copley Square Farmers Market is a great place to buy fresh produce and sample items from businesses that use locally grown ingredients. I stumbled upon the market one Friday afternoon and I immediately was thrilled with my discovery. Having just returned from a four month stay in Paris, I was missing the open air fruit and vegetable marchés that I had grown accustomed to shopping at.  That's why when I found this market I was excited that it had a similar feel to those in France. All the food is fresh, and made with REAL ingredients, which is very different from the majority of the products I find in grocery stores here in the US.


What's the best part? FREE FOOD! Many local restaurants, bakeries, and cafes give away free samples at their booths. That means you can not only try delicious fresh fruit, but also taste products like Boston's best (in my opinion) cheesecake from 7ate9 bakery. So, even if you've already done your grocery shopping for the week The Copley Square Market is still worth checking out if you want to snack on new treats from a restaurant you've never tried before or just need a good excuse to get outside and explore a part of the city in the summer. The market is open every Tuesday and Friday from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm.

     

The Greenway

The Rose Kennedy Greenway is a lively spot in Boston during the summer. Located in the financial district across from South Station, the Greenway is another great place to buy and sample delicious foods from over 20 vendors, like fresh baked bread from When Pigs Fly Bakery and ice cream from Honeycomb Creamery.  The Greenway hosts markets Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:30 am to 6:30 pm, which means if you're getting sick of the boring lunch you bring to work every day, the Greenway market can be the perfect solution as many vendors sell "grab and go" lunches and prepared food to enjoy outside on the lawn of the park.

Another interesting lunch idea is to visit one of the many food trucks that park on and around the Greenway everyday  as part of the Greenway Mobile Eats Program.  You can find just about every type of cuisine, as trucks range anywhere from Zinneken's Belgian waffles to Bon Me's Asian food. So, while it might not be as healthy as fresh vegetables from the farmers market, you'll definitely be able to find a delicious meal no matter what you're craving.

 

The Greenway is also home to the Greenway Open Market every Saturday and every first and third Sunday of the month until October. Like the other seasonal markets, the Open Market consists of local businesses, however it is uniquely an artisan market. Local area artists and designers sell their works here on three consecutive sections of the park. If you're an art lover, proud small business supporter or just looking for something to do this weekend I strongly recommend taking a look!

A Father's Day for Everyone

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, June 16, 2016

Father’s Day is this Sunday. Yes, red alert, Father’s Day is THIS Sunday. I’m sure between summer expeditions and the (occasional) work that must be done, you’ve probably forgotten to plan something for dad’s day. Well, don’t fret. I’ve got you covered.

(you too mom)

Father’s Day, in my eyes, is basically the same as Mother’s Day. It’s about honoring the people that raised you, and engrained in you the most precious values you have. I mean, this Mother’s Day was the first Mother’s Day I’ve spent with my entire family in 6 years. Yes! 6 long years. Even though I didn’t give you guys plans for Mother’s Day, (which shame on me, I know), I’ve decided that this blog is not only about honoring your dad, but also honoring your mom (for God’s sake, she pushed you out of her womb). You know, there are many types of families out there, with two moms, a single mom, a single dad  - so no matter if your dad is present (I’m lucky and blessed that mine is), you’ll have something to do this Sunday!

Father’s Day for Dad:

For the Brew Junkie:

Brew is an in beer, just to put that out there. If your dad loves beers, and you’re in Boston (which you should be, Boston is amazing), they’ve you’re pretty lucky. Boston has some of the best local brews in the country. Because “local” in Boston means anything from New Hampshire to Maine, that leaves us with a huge variety. If you’re looking for some place to get your beer one, check out: The Publick House, Sunset Grill, Boston Beer Works, and Cambridge Brewing Company.

For the Breakfast Junkie:

My dad isn’t much of a drinker, but he is a lover of breakfast food – and by breakfast food I mean a Swiss cheese omelet with a side of extra crispy bacon. Oh, and the coffee that he always forgets to order. If your dad is anything like mine, brunch is most certainly a necessity on Sunday morning.

Museum of Science:

I know what you must be thinking, brunch at the museum? Yes! Brunch at the SCIENCE museum, seriously could not get any cooler. Though I’m not a fan of buffets, not because I don’t love all the food I can gobble down, but because I tend to over eat, cry, and then continue eating, I would sign up for a Wolfgang Puck brunch any day. Not only will you be chowing down on some seriously delicious eats, but you’ll be seated in the Skyline Room overlooking the Charles River.

(i don't know these people but how cute are they)

Café Fleuri:

Barbecue is a summer staple, but sometimes, it’s also a dad staple. So because it’s both summer and Father’s Day, The Langham Hotel is pretty ideal. All their brunch items are BBQ inspired. Oink Oink!

For the Animal Lover:

The Franklin Park Zoo offers free admission to all dads. Yes, free admission. Do you think if I wore a mustache and a cap I could pass for a (young and handsome) dad?

Father’s Day for the other dad, Mom:

Yes, Father’s Day for moms is a thing. We’re very used to having a mental image of what a typical family is, but it’s 2016, there is no such thing as a typical family. Like I’ve mentioned, there are families with two moms, two dads, a single mom, a mom and a dad (and maybe you just want to thank your mom again); there’s seriously every kind of family out there. So why not take this day to celebrate the mom in your life too?

For the Spa Lover:

The Emerge Spa has a Father’s Day treatment deal, but it’s also valid for moms. Between getting a relaxing pedicure, a cucumber facial, and the (not so relaxing, but sometimes needed) wax, you’ll make mama very very happy.

For the Vino Lover:

Did you know there’s a Boston Wine School? Yes, you can register for classes, have some tastings, and learn about different kinds of grapes all in the same place. So for the vino loving mama in your life, you can either take it back to your college days and sign up for a class, or you can take her of a City Wine Tour. Mamma Mia!

(sorry I'm wine-y)

For the Instagram Lover (just so she can post super cool boat pics):

Take her on either the lunch or sunset cruise with Spirit Cruises. There’s an open bar, a DJ, and panoramic views of the gorgeous Boston skyline. If your mom’s a photographer (very much like mine), the cruise back drop is perfect for a new insta post.

This coming Sunday is about loving the ones you’re with, and the ones in your life. There’s obviously a special shout out there to the people that raised you, so raise your glasses (beer, wine, or iced coffee), and thank them. They deserve it.

The OG Lemonade

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve heard about Beyoncé’s new album, Lemonade. She had an HBO special video release, and she basically publicly embarrassed her cheating husband – go Queen Bey.

I’m sure you heard about the Jay-Z, Beyoncé scandal when it happened. Her sister, Solange, took upon herself to smack around Jay-Z when rumors of his affair with Rachel Roy surfaced. Now, it’s not really confirmed whether or not they actually had an affair – but when Queen Bey decides to write a song talking about Becky with the good hair, you best believe it happened. If you didn’t make that connection: Rachel is Becky with the good hair (just google her, she really does have some great hair).

You’re probably asking me what this has to do with any of you? Well, it really has nothing to do with you. Unless you’re a close personal friend of Queen Bey, this probably hasn’t really affected your life. However, let’s think back to the title of her album. That’s right, sweet and sour, ice-cold lemonade. All this lemonade talk had me really craving a tall glass of the stuff. So it had me thinking, Boston must have good lemonade. Yeah okay, that sounds ridiculously boring – and who really goes out for a glass of lemonade? Well, I do. I happen to love lemonade so keep your judgments aside. So as to not bore you, I came up with a lemonade-pairing list too. That’s right, you won’t have to walk up to a nice restaurant and order lemonade. That way, you won’t be embarrassed, and they most likely won’t spit in your drink.

Bon Me

Bon Me is mostly known for their food trucks, that roam around Boston leaving a trail of ginger and garlic deliciousness behind. They have everything from sandwiches, to rice bowls, to noodle soups, but guess what they also have? Lemonades, duh! And they don’t just have one, they have two. Bon Me – the lemonade truck of a lifetime. Good news for you, you won’t have to run after a truck in the middle of the street, because they have two permanent locations: at the Boston Public Market and in Harvard Square (what did I tell you? Harvard Square has everything). Once you order either the Thai Basil Limeade or the Spicy Ginger Lemonade (I’m not giving you an option, you must order either or), make sure to order the Soba Noodle Salad and BBQ Pork to go along with them.

(forget the salad, put some bread in your order)

Café Jaffa

I love Middle Eastern food. I’ve talked about how much I love lamb, and lamb just so happens to be one of the most popular cuts of meat in Middle Eastern cuisine.  Café Jaffa has basically everything lamb. Lamb Kabobs, Lamb Chops, Lamb Schwarma – guys this is lamb paradise. Not that I would condone getting anything but lamb at Café Jaffa, but once you order the lemonana (lemonade with mint, yum), you can either pair it with the obvious lamb kebab sandwich, or the falafel plate.

(steve carell gets me)

Moby Dick

Yes, I’m back with the Middle Eastern food (damn C, back at it with the kabobs and hummus). Hey, I told you how much I love it – so bear with me guys. I’ve only been to Moby Dick once, but that’s honestly all it took. Seriously, they have one of the best rice dishes I’ve ever had. It’s on Northeastern campus, and you’ll most likely walk past it- it’s squished between two other restaurants. So keep a watchful eye out, because you seriously don’t want to miss this place. This blog is about lemonade, right? So I should mention they also serve saffron lemonade. Yes, saffron the super expensive Spanish spice – they put that in their lemonade. That’s some fancy fare right there.

Boston Common

This isn’t a restaurant, so don’t feel embarrassed if all you want to order is a lemonade. The Boston Common is one of the most beautiful parts of Boston, but what most people don’t know, it has some pretty great munchies too. Last summer I was walking around the park, and I really started craving something ice cold (no not a beer, and definitely not water). So I went on a search, and I found like 10 lemonade stands. If you’re lucky enough, and you’re there early, you’ll be able to snatch some lemonade slushies. If not, just have a regular lemonade – it’s just as delicious, and it won’t melt as quickly as the slushy. If you’re feeling hungry, and are craving something cheesy (I mean, who isn’t always craving cheese?), go find the arepa stand. Arepas, for those of you who don’t know (shame on you), is a Colombian corn patty cheese sandwich type thing. It’s really hard to explain to people who didn’t grow up on it, so do yourself a favor and discover the goodness that is the arepa de choclo.

(that's an arepa AND lemonade stand)

Okay, I get it lemonades aren’t things you go out of your way for, but lemonade pairings, they sure are.  As Beyoncé says, this is your final warning, you know (lemonades) give you life.

I’m not kidding, go get yourself a lemonade right now.

You have 24 hours.

(yaaaaas queeen)

Run, Boston, Run!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, April 14, 2016

Marathon Monday is quite possibly known as Boston's second Christmas. And I'm not even exaggerating here. I was actually speaking to one of my neighbors on Monday, and she told me how she marks off the whole weekend and week before Marathon Monday, just to prep herself (and she's not even running the marathon).

(just in case you didn't catch my title reference)

Before 2013, the Marathon was a day to go out, have a couple (or several) drinks, and cheer on friends, family, or random runners at the finish line. That all changed on April 15th, 2013. I don't want to go into the specifics, because quite frankly, we all know what happened at the Boston bombing. I was sitting on my friend's couch, enjoying her birthday festivities and my Georgetown cupcake, when all of a sudden, everything changed. I scrambled to find my phone, just to tell my parents and sister that I was okay, and that I'd try to keep them as informed as possible. Soon after, all cell services were blocked and I felt like I was in a some sort of trance. I was a freshman in college! I had never experienced anything like it, and needless to say, that was one of the worst weeks of my life.

I am beyond lucky to say that I wasn't on the finish line that day, and that my best friend had decided to leave Boylston about 15 minutes before the bombs went off.

Almost three years after that horrific day, Boston has gotten back on track. What happened during the marathon was one of the worst things Boston has ever seen, but what happened after, truly showed how one city can really come together in a time of remorse. There was a massive amount of support given to everyone and anyone who was in some way affected by the marathon bombing, and Boston didn't let anyone take their strength and resilience away. The city was the true embodiment of Boston Strong.

Though I do think we should take Monday to love our families and friends a little more, to thank whatever force you believe in that we're still around and we're still alive, I also believe there are many places around Boston to do so.

Boston Marathon Pre-Race Dinner

Whether you're running the marathon, or just watching it, there's always an excuse to carbo-load. At City Hall, starting at 4pm the night before, there will be an abundance of trays to any and all food and marathon lovers. If you're a superhuman running the Boston Marathon, you can eat for free! If you're lazy like me, and the thought of running more than 5 minutes absolutely horrifies you, you'll just have to pay $20 for all you can eat. On the menu are FOUR different pasta dishes, and a salad if you're feeling like pasta isn't enough for you.

Midnight Marathon Bike Ride

Now, I'm not much (or at all) of a runner. In fact, I actually hate running. I get bored, and I just don't have the will-power to force myself to do it. However, I do love biking. I am an avid spinner, and will literally bike anywhere because (thankfully) I've built up a resistance to do so. This event is basically perfect for me, but I will most likely find some excuse to stuff my face instead of attending. But don't be like me, and bike away! Every year, thousands of people gather and bike across the city, only to be greeted by a pancake breakfast right after. Yes, it's basically like pulling an all nighter for pancakes, but you deserve them after pedaling so much.

(pedal away pedal gods)

T.J. Spirits

This isn't so much an event, more like a restaurant that I highly recommend. Even though it's not located anywhere near the finish line, this place has some true marathon celebrations. You'll see your typical finger-lickin' wings, and make-your-own burgers, but what's most important is their marathon inspired beer. They serve Sam Adams' signature 26.2 marathon brew. It has a lower alcohol content, so if you're a runner looking for a post race drink, this may be the perfect solution for you - because if I were to have a regular beer on a post-workout empty stomach, I'd probably faint.

Cityside

If you're looking for a more up close and personal view of the marathon, Cityside has panoramic views that are just for you. On Marathon Monday, they open at 9am (say it with me: rise, and shine, and wine), so arrive there early for the best views on their rooftop patio or by the windows! Between the drafts, fishbowls, and greasy eats, you'll be glad you're watching the marathon, and not running it.

I rounded out what I think are some of the best to-dos on Patriot's Day. There are obviously hundreds of other places you can go, and if you didn't particularly like any of my suggestions (rude),  you can look on the BAA website and find some other places (mine are the best, just sayin').

Before I sign off, I'd also like to remind everyone of the holiday on Sunday, April 17th. If you happen to not know (shame on you), it's INTERNATIONAL (yeah she's internationally known) IT'S MY SISTER'S BDAY, DAY. You might be busy prepping for the race, or carbo loading, but whatever you're doing, send some positive vibes out and have a drink for her. She likes champagne (Moet and Veuve only, duh) and chocolate lava cakes, so order those.

Happy birthday my munchkin. Even though no one likes you when you're 23, everyone loves you when you're 24. 

(even leo)

Milking on Some Shakes

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, April 07, 2016

The world is having a milkshake moment. No, it's not a delayed response to Kelis's song Milkshake, circa 2003 - even though, 13 years later, it's still a major hit and you can catch me singing and (poorly) dancing along to it. All over the world, restaurants have been making giant milkshakes. Yes. GIANT MILKSHAKES.

It all started in the land down under, Aussie baby. Patissez, in 2015, started serving their sinfully delicious concoctions in adorable little mason jars. Well, not really mason jars because they're not in America, but pretty close to it. Now, this all sounds pretty impressive, but what puts this pastry shop over the top, is the fact that when they first started serving their milkshakes, they were only 52 days old. In 52 days, they were able to get international attention on their now nationally prided milkshakes. I can't even get my life together in 52 days - but that's beside the point. Canberra, the town where the shop is located, used to be known as Australia's boring getaway. But bore no more - they have thousands of visitors flying, boating, driving, walking (literally everything) just to get a taste of their giant caloric treats. As of now, they have flavors like Salty Nutz, Muddy Pat, French Vanilla (if you're going all the way to Aussie, please don't be vanilla and order the vanilla), and last but not least - wait for it - Nutella & Salty Pretzel. The Nutella & Salty Pretzel is quite possibly about to solve my biggest problem - being too lazy to dunk my pretzels in my giant jar of Nutella. First world problems am I right?

(just let the image sink in)

Okay, the reality of it is, most of us can't afford a foodie trip to Australia, but thanks to the beautiful island of Manhattan, we have basically the same (maybe even a little better) milkshakes on this side of the pond. This place is called Black Tap Craft Burgers & Beer (say that three times fast). With two locations, one in SoHo and the other in the Meatpacking District, they're gathering crowds of thousands, causing about a two hour wait time just to get a sip and a bite of their creations. Their milkshakes measure up to about a foot tall, and get this, they're not going to break your bank. They're $15, and they can feed an army. Black Tap's chef and owner, Joe Isidori, credits his success to his wife. Legend has it (can it really be a legend if it happened in November), she asked Joe to whip up a cotton candy milkshake, she posted about it on Instagram, and the milkshake cult began. They have everything from the OG cotton candy, to cookie, to salted caramel apple, and get this, a birthday cake milkshake with an entire slice of cake on top. My sister's birthday is next weekend (hi munchkin, expect a birthday post soon), so it's basically the perfect time to not only have a slice of cake but a giant milkshake too.  

(hi pretties)

Again, these all sound fine and dandy, but we're in Boston, and Boston HAS to have delicious milkshakes too. Well, I'm way ahead of you. I've made a list of the best milkshakes in Boston , so put your mileage cards away, and sell your NYC bus ticket, you won't need to go far for these treats.

Lizzy's Homemade Ice Cream

Classic Vanilla Milkshake

Even though ordering vanilla ice cream at an ice cream parlor is, well, vanilla - it's also the best way to test out how good their ice cream really is. Vanilla is the easiest flavor to make, but the hardest flavor to make well. Everyone has it, so to really nail it, you have to do something truly incredible. That's what Lizzy's has managed to do. Their milkshakes milk to ice cream ratio is just spot on, and it's not at all watery - you'll sip on a creamy and smooth, yet thick milkshake. Maybe you're not so vanilla, vanilla.

Burger Dive

Peanut Butter & Banana Milkshake

I'm allergic to bananas and I'm putting this on my lineup, so you're welcome. Even though I'd likely take the banana out of my shake, I'd definitely still order it. Guys, this is the Elvis of milkshakes. You might be slightly confused with why I'm sending you there - the ambiance is a little...interesting.. Featuring stunning views of a parking lot, but it's worth the eye sore. If you're not a peanut butter banana person, order either the s'mores or fudge brownie milkshake, and let your chocolate mustache rejoice in all its glory.

LA Burdick

Dark Chocolate

Speaking of chocolate, if you're a fan of it, you should definitely make a pit stop at LA Burdick. I'll preface my ode to the dark chocolate shake by mentioning what makes it so unique - it has no ice cream in it. This may offend you, but just listen up for a second. Instead of ice cream, LA Burdick freezes little cubes of  its absolutely incredible hot chocolate, then blends them. You'll then get a dollop of whipped cream and an actual truffle on top. If that doesn't convince you to run to LA Burdick right now, are you really a chocoholic?

Emack & Bolio's

LITERALLY ANYTHING, but actually order the Orange Cream ASAP

My love-hate relationship with this place comes down to a simple fact - they're my next door neighbors and they have made my scale hate me. So I technically don't hate them, I just really really love them too much. I'm a huge fan of Orange Creams, and this place makes me order them to the point where my pants no longer fit. Their recipe is super simple: OJ and Vanilla ice cream or yogurt (I obviously order the yogurt - trying to watch my weight over here), but it's simply delicious.

I know it's cold outside, but milkshakes are appropriate in any season. So go, unbutton your skinny jeans, and have a shake. Who knows? Your milkshakes might just bring some boys to the yard.


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