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Explore Boston: Neighborhood Series

Global Immersions Recruiting - Sunday, October 20, 2019

This week in our Neighborhoods Series, we’re highlighting Arlington, Cambridge and Somerville. Closer to Boston, these cities have lots of fantastic restaurants, some colleges, and historical events and landmarks. And, of course, there’s never a shortage of activities to engage in - from museums to biking paths. We’ll start with the city furthest from Boston (Arlington) and move our way in!


Arlington

Located at the end of the Red Line, Arlington has more of a suburban feel, but definitely has a lot to do.  Home to the Jason Russell House (see picture above), this city, bordering Lexington, was a key player in the Revolutionary War. Originally a more rural community rooted in agriculture, Arlington eventually developed into a heavily populated suburb of Boston.  The Smith Museum, located right next to the Jason Russell House, has exhibits that show the development of the town from prehistoric times to present day. If you want to really experience the patriots march, you can walk or bike along the Minuteman Bike Path from Alewife to Lexington. Present day Arlington contains some gems of the Boston area in terms of food and activities. With a diverse range of restaurants, from Argentinian cuisine at Tango to authentic and delicious sushi at Toraya, they’ve got some good fancy eats as well as their fair-share of casual American fare and pizza parlors.  And if you’re looking to follow dinner with a movie, Arlington has a couple options, from more current movies at the Capitol Theatre to special musical performances and movie festival flicks at the RegentTheatre.  If you want to enjoy some dessert, Arlington has many options, from the mouth-watering cookies at Cookie Time to the rich ice cream at Abilyn’s Frozen Bakery.  And for your late night fix, The ScoopN Scootery is open and serving ice cream sundaes until 2 am!


Somerville

Getting closer to Boston, and further along the Red Line, Somerville has more of a city feel and has major centers for restaurants and boutiques in Davis, Porter, and Union Square. There are also a number of smaller squares, including Magoun, Inman, and Ball Square.  Somerville also houses Tufts University, so there are a lot of college-age residents in the area along with young families, immigrants, and long-time residents Being so highly and diversely populated, there is a huge variety of events, community groups, and things to enjoy. In Davis Square alone, there’s the over-100-year-old SomervilleTheatre which shows both contemporary films and also has special showings of classics like The Rocky Horror Picture Show, along with bowling and pizza at Sacco’sBowl Haven and Flatbreads, and live music at The Burren.  Not only that, but there’s a number of clothing stores, bars, and other amazing restaurants like Redbones BBQ and Tenoch Mexican and to enjoy. And while Somerville has a lot of older infrastructure, there is a lot of newly developing sections, like Assembly Row shopping center, which has restaurants, tons of shops, and a movie theater. There is always somewhere to be or something to do for any interest- whether it’s enjoying the view from Prospect Hill (see picture above) or going out one of the many festivals, concerts, or markets. 

Cambridge

Right next to Somerville, Cambridge directly borders Boston, and feels almost like an extension of the city. It is host to many prestigious colleges, like Harvard and MIT, and, like Somerville, has a wide diversity in its population.  There are so many fun places to explore for all different interests. For the cinephile, Kendall Landmark Theatre and Brattle Theatre both host a number of independent films and movie marathons, like the upcoming Saturday Morning All-You-Can-Eat-Cereal Cartoon Party at Brattle. And if you’re more interested in shopping, there are malls like the CambridgesideGalleria for more well-known stores and also lots of vintage stores, like RaspberryBeret. On a beautiful sunny day, you can drop by Paddle Boston and rent a canoe, paddleboard, or kayak to take out on the Charles River. If the weather is crummy, there are also many museums in the area to check out, including the Harvard ArtMuseums (pictured above) for art lovers, the Museum of Science for an interactive experience for the whole family, or the MIT Museum for a mix of technology and history. In terms of food, Cambridge has too many options to list! For everyone from the carnivore to the vegan, fine-dining to fast casual, and a huge cultural diversity in cuisine. You can check out this list of “33 Essential Cambridge Restaurants” to get an idea of all the options out there.


Upcoming Boston Food Festivals

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, July 10, 2019



Are you a pizza lover? From 12pm - 8pm on Saturday July 13 and Sunday July 14 head to the Boston Pizza Festival at Boston City Hall Plaza. Be prepared for live music, pizza acrobats, pizza tossing stations and more entertainment. With 30 pizzerias, there are endless amounts of options including vegan and gluten free options! Tickets are on sale and only $15 for an excellent experience of taste testing handmade pizzas! Click here for more information.




Donut Fest is coming on Sunday, July 28 from 11am - 6pm at Underground Ink Block. You’ll find 10 different donut vendors, food & ice cream trucks, live music, giveaways, Instagram backdrops, and much more entertainment! There are donuts for everyone, with even gluten free and vegan options available. Tickets start at only $12 for this delicious donut filled event! Click here for more information.



Craving a plate full of fresh, local seafood? Check out the Boston Seafood Festival from 11 am - 6pm on Sunday, August 4 at the Boston Fish Pier. This is their 8th year of sharing spectacular seafood with the Boston area. The festival features live chef demos, a fish cutting contest, “Battle of the Shuckers”, outstanding food from over 15 vendors, and much more! Tickets are only $15 for a day filled with sensational seafood. Click here for more information.


History of Ice Cream in America

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, May 16, 2019


Ice cream has been part of the American culture since our Founding Fathers built our nation! Records by New York Merchants show that George Washington spent $200 alone on ice cream in the summer of 1790. He even had a 306 piece ice cream serving set in the home used when entertaining his guests. What’s more, Thomas Jefferson is credited with introducing the first ice cream recipe to the United States after tasting the frozen treat earlier in France. He had ice boxes installed at his estate, Monticello, so that he could serve ice cream all year long! Ultimately ice cream was reserved for the elite until around 1800 when insulated ice houses were invented, which helped to popularize the treat for the masses. Even immigrants coming to Ellis Island were often given ice cream as their first taste of America!




The American ice cream industry took off in 1851 with the help of milk dealer, Jacob Fussell. From there, as technologies involving refrigeration, mechanization, automobile distribution, and pasteurization advanced, ice cream rates of production and consumption skyrocketed! Consumption rates were at an all time high at the beginning of Prohibition as the people substituted one vice for another (alcohol to ice cream) with a national consumption of 260 million gallons of ice cream in 1920! Later on after World War II, we celebrated the end of the war by eating ice cream with returning troops after the dairy product ration was lifted. That is just about as patriotic as it gets. In the 1980's in the lingerings of the Cold War, Ronald Reagan declared the month of July, National Ice Cream Month, as a way to lift the morale of the American people. Today, the average American consumes more than 45 pints of ice cream per year, which equates to around $10 billion in frozen dairy consumption both in the winters and summers. It is safe to say that ice cream and the American culture go hand in hand.



If you have ever had American ice cream, you know that we take our toppings and flavors very seriously. One of the leading American ice cream brands, Ben and Jerry’s, boasts of having more than 54 flavors currently available for consumer purchase ranging from plain vanilla to pistachio to strawberry cheesecake. And there are so many ways to eat ice cream too! We eat hard ice cream, soft serve, milkshakes, cones to choose from, ice cream trucks, ice cream parlors, and more. Many ice cream shops have topping bars that may include hot fudge, caramel, sprinkles, cookies, candies, etc. Choose your favorite combination or switch it up every time! Lucky for you, Boston has some of the best ice cream parlors in the country. Click here for our favorite places in the city for ice cream!

Which Boston ice cream place is your favorite? Share with us @globalimmersions or by using #HomestayBoston!


Sources: NPR, Boston, IDFA, Washington



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