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Welcome to Boston Homestay - Danish Ringkjobing Group!13-Oct-2018

Global Immersions Homestay welcomed a large group of visitors from Ringkjøbing in Denmark. T..

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The Global Immersions Homestay office will be closed on Fridays beginning Friday, October 5, 201..


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Famous Foods in MA

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, November 13, 2018


What food item is Massachusetts best known for? You might recognize certain brands - like Fluffernutter, Ken's Steakhouse dressing, or Cape Cod Potato chips, from trips to the local grocery store with your host family. These products are among the most famous foods to originate in Massachusetts and have become popular nationally. Maybe you’ve been to the Somerville Fluff Festival? Then you’ll know that Massachusetts takes pride in its food innovations. To show appreciation for similar food creations, Thrillist recently published this article, detailing the most important foods to come from each state. The results for New England were what you might expect, Maine was recognized for its lobster rolls, Vermont for Ben & Jerry’s Ice cream, and Connecticut for the burger. L.A. Burdick Chocolate mice were highlighted in New Hampshire, Del’s Lemonade was chosen for Rhode Island…and Massachusetts’ most important food contribution was Dunkin Donuts.

If you've ever wandered through the streets of Boston, this may not come as such a surprise. You can a find a Dunkin' (or two) on almost any street, and the corporation never has a shortage of advertisements on Boston's billboards, taxi cabs, or buildings. Just how many Dunkin's are there in Massachusetts? Well, according to the map below, there's a lot. Boston.com counts 61 Dunkin stores in Boston alone, with countless others across the state, and over 9,000 in the continental US with about 2,000 stores in 36 countries internationally. In Massachusetts, the brand outnumbers Starbucks 10 to 1, so maybe Boston really does run on Dunkin'?

(Map of every Dunkin' in MA)

How did Massachusetts most famous corporation, and apparent greatest food contribution, get its start? It's an interesting story. In 1948, Dunkin' founder, William Rosenberg owned a coffee shop in Quincy, Massachusetts called "Open Kettle". In 1950, Rosenberg changed the shop's name to "Dunkin Donuts", thus the first Dunkin' store was born. The store then began to be franchised in 1955 and grew form there. Recently Dunkin Donuts dropped the "Donuts" from its name and now just goes by Dunkin'. The corporation is currently headquartered south of Boston in Canton, Massachusetts.

 

In 1990 Dunkin’ acquired their main competitor, Mister Donut and changed many of those locations to Dunkins. However, a lot of the international locations were not changed, which is why you can still find a Mister Donut in several countries abroad. If you’re a student from Japan or another Southeast Asian nation, then perhaps you’ve been! Of course, there are many other places in the city find the perfect donut. If this post made you hungry for something frosted and sweet, treat yourself to a snack from one of Boston’s best donut shops. Enjoy!

Veteran's Day in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, November 08, 2018

Sunday is Veterans Day, the federal holiday that honors and celebrates those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Veterans Day falls on the same day as Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are observed in other countries to commemorate the anniversary of the end of World War I. Veterans Day always falls on November 11th, as World War I ended at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. The holiday became official in 1954 after Armistice Day in the U.S. was renamed to Veterans  Day. Boston has a lot of events happening this week in honor of Veterans Day. Here are a few of the highlights: 


Veterans Day Parades                               

Boston has two annual Veteran’s Day Parades. The Boston Veteran’s Day Parade and the Veteran’s Peace Parade. The “original” Veterans Day celebration, the Veteran’s Day Parade, takes place on November 11th at the corner of Boylston and Tremont streets. The parade route continues on to City Hall Plaza and Faneuil Hall next to the statue of Sam Adams. The Parade features a variety of different participants, from ROTC groups to Veteran’s organizations, honorary militias, and marching bands. The Peace Parade follows a similar route, beginning shortly after the first parade. The Peace Parade also features a similar group of marching bands and veteran’s groups, however, it focuses more on the original intention of Armistice Day, as a celebration of Peace. Spectators can expect to see signs and banners promoting peace and non-violent solutions to wars or conflict. The Peace Parade was founded in 1985 by Veterans for Peace, an organization dedicated to increasing awareness about the harsh realities of war. At the conclusion of each parade, parade-goers are welcome to gather by the statute of Sam Adams to listen to speeches, anti-war reading, poetry, and music.


Veteran’s Day Harbor Cruise

The Harbor Cruise is a popular Veteran's Day tradition for both military and non-military families. On Saturday, November 10th, families are invited to tour Fort Warren on Georges Island to learn of Boston’s centuries-long military history, from the American Revolution through the Civil War and up to present day, while honoring past and present soldiers. The cruise departs from the Charlestown Navy Yard and from Long Wharf at 11:00 am and return at 3:00 pm.  Tickets are $10 for non-military members and free for active duty military members and up to three of their family members. To make sure you (and your host family) get a spot on the cruise, register here. 


Charity Walks & Runs

Two charity race take place this Veteran’s Day Weekend- the Dav 5K and Somerville Honor Run. The Dav 5K is a walk, run, or motorcycle race that honors those who have served and raises awareness of the issues and illnesses that military veterans may face. The event takes place on Boston’s Castle Island at 9:00 am on November 10th. The proceeds from the Dav 5K are used to support local organizations for veteran’s and their families. The second race, the Somerville Honor Runbenefits Somerville's George Dilboy VFW Post #529 and honors all those men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces. The event starts at 9:00 am on November 11th in Davis Square and consists of a 4-mile route. All participants get a long sleeve running shirt and entry to the post-race block party, where local restaurants and breweries will be providing refreshments. You can get your ticket to the race here.

We hope you enjoy your long weekend, and to the veterans in our host network – we thank you for your service! 

2018 World Series: Fun Facts

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Sunday night, the Boston Red Sox defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the 2018 World Series Champions! The two teams played an exciting 5 -games series, ending in a Red Sox victory. Did you watch the game with your host family? If so, did you know that you were one of the 30 million people that tuned in to see the Red Sox make history? Did you also know that before 2018, it had been 30 years since the LA Dodgers played in the World Series? or that a team hasn't won 108 games (like the Red Sox did this season) since 1986? WalletBase.com did some research and created this infographic to show these statistics and other facts about the World Series. If you're interested in learning some lesser-known info about Major League Baseball's annual championship, we put together some of the best fun facts:

The Players (and their salaries):

It’s no surprise that a career as  Major League Baseball player is a very lucrative profession. The highest paid player on the LA Dodgers, Klayton Kershaw makes $35.57 million a year and earns about $220,800 every inning he pitches. The highest paid player on the Red Sox, David Price, earns $30 million a year and about $170,500 every inning he pitches. The LA Dodgers team salary is $196.6 million, and the Red Sox team salary is $224.8 million. That’s a lot of $$$$! 

Viewership

Whether you’re a baseball fan or not, if you’re in Boston you probably watched at least one game of the World Series. Typically the last game of the World Series draws close to 30 million viewers (approximately 29.3 million for game 7 last year). The World Series as a whole was seen by 18.9 million people in 2017 and 13.7 million people this year. 


Ticket Sales

As you might have guessed, tickets to the World Series don’t come cheap. Any baseball super fan at Dodgers Stadium or Fenway Park during Game 1 of the World Series paid at least $321 for their seat according to WalletHub.  That number is cheap in comparison to last year ’s game 5, where $828 was the cheapest ticket price. It is estimated that the average ticket prices for the 2018 World Series games in Boston and Los Angeles were $1,290 and $1,965 respectively. This is similar to last year’s stats, where the average price of a ticket to the 2017 World Series was over $1,000. 

Ad Revenue

Tickets might be expensive, but the real money is in TV ad revenue. Corporations spend an average of $6355,000 for a 30-second commercial during the World Series (not bad compared to the 5 million+ dollars spent on a 30 second SuperBowl Ad). It is projected that ad revenue totals $58.1 million for each game beyond the minimum of four. Fox, TBS, and ESPN will have paid a total of $12.4 billion for the broadcast rights to the World Series from 2014 to 2021. In 2017 the total ad revenue generated by the World Series was $414 million, this year’s World Series most likely generated less, having only 5 games instead of 7. 


If you want to cheer on Boston's favorite sports team as they celebrate their World Series win, check out the Boston Red Sox Parade this Wednesday, October 31st! 

Red Sox World Series Victory Parade 

Date: October 31st 

Time: 11:00 am 

Place: Landsdown Street 

We want to see you in your Boston Red Sox gear! Share your World Series celebrations with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Seven Can’t Miss Sights in Salem, MA

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Salem, the Massachusetts city infamous for the 1692 witch trials is the perfect destination for a spooky weekend excursion. Salem in October is full of festive activities to get you in the Halloween spirit and out of Boston for a day! When planning your Salem trip itinerary, be sure to make time to visit these seven spots. 


Salem Willows

While Salem might be known for its “witches” it also has a beautiful waterfront that should not be overlooked. Salem Willows is a public, seaside, park offering scenic views and the world’s best popcorn along with a popular arcade and carousel ride. While you're there, stop by nearby Pickering Wharf - another location along the Salem waterfront that has adorable shops and tasty restaurants.



The Salem Witch Museum

The Salem Witch Museum is probably the most famous museum in Salem. The Witch Museum gives visitors a life-like retelling of Salem's 17th-century history, featuring stage sets with wax figures, lighting, and narration to present an accurate depiction of the Salem Witch Trials. The current exhibit, "Witches-Evolving Perceptions", draws parallels in history between the "witches" of 1692 to the Japanese-Americans encamped during WWII and the blacklisted Communists of the 1950s. The Museum is open daily with extended hours in October. 

The House of Seven Gables

This historic home was built in 1668 and was once owned by serval prominent maritime families. The home is perhaps most well known for being famously chronicled in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel of the same name. If you're visiting Salem, check out the House of Seven Gables for a guided tour...and decided for yourself if it’s truly as haunted as the stories say.

The Witch House

Another famous Salem home, the Salem Witch House, is the only remaining structure in Salem with direct ties to the Witch Trials. The home was once inhabited by Judge Jonathan Corwin, one of the Salem residents investigating the claims of witchcraft in 1692, and one of the people partly responsible for convicting 20 people of witchcraft. It is said that many of those convicted could have been interrogated by Corwin right in the homes living room. Visitors to Salem can stop by for both guided and self-guided tours.

Spooky Walking Tours

Salem has several night-time walking tours that allow you to learn the town's history in an informative yet terrifying manner. The Salem Witch Walk and Haunted Footsteps Ghost Tour are two popular options. On the Witch Walk, witches take you on a tour of the Salem seaport, while on the Ghost Tour guests are taken through the haunted areas of Salem's streets. 


Harbor Sweets

It wouldn’t be Halloween time without candy! If you’re looking for something sweet and less spooky, head to Harbor Sweets to stock up on all the goodies you need for October 31st.  All the candies and chocolates inside are handmade, so you know you’ll be trying authentic New England treats. 

How Should I Get There? 

If you're planning to visit Salem from the Boston area, you can take the Commuter Rail Newburyport/Rockport Line to Salem. 

Remember to share all your weekend activities with by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

How to Spend Your Long Weekend

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, October 04, 2018
What is Columbus Day?? If you’re not familiar with this U.S. federal holiday you can read about its origins here. If you've spent the holiday in Boston before, you'll know that the most exciting part of Columbus Day is taking a mini-vacation away from school. If you’re a student in the Boston area you probably know that Columbus Day means you have an extra-long weekend, which also means you now have extra time to explore the city! Lucky for you there are a lot of fun events happening things weekend and many of them are free. Here are some ways to spend the upcoming long weekend in the city.



East Boston Columbus Day Parade
Head to East Boston Sunday afternoon to experience Columbus Day in the city. Watch and enjoy the annual Columbus Day Parade that has occurred in Boston since 1937. The parade will begin at 1:00 pm in the Suffolk Downs parking lot and will march down Bennington Street, ending at Maverick Square near the waterfront. The parade will feature local organizations as well as veterans groups and can best be viewed from the sidewalk along Bennington Street. 



Chicken Stock 

You might be familiar with the Boston area restaurant, the Chicken and Rice guys. Maybe you've seen their food truck on campus? Well, did you know that they are hosting a free event at the Medford Condon Shell this Saturday? The event will feature live funk, soul and R&B music from local artists as well as free Chicken and Rice Guy's food. The party's main event is their 5th annual ChickyRice eating contest and the Extra Hot Sauce Challenge, where the top contestants can win free Chicken and Rice Guys for a year. If you LOVE chicken and rice or have a high tolerance for spicy food you can sign up for the contest on their event page, however, it might just be fun to watch the other contestants compete.




HONK!

The HONK! festival returns this year to Somerville, for even more music, performances, and celebration. HONK! is a 3-day street band festival, where musicians from all over the U.S. (wielding a variety of brass and percussion instruments) play throughout the city's streets, with no sound speakers or stage to separate them from spectators. HONK! creates an immersive experience as the musicians play among the audience and invite them to join the fun. The festival kicks off Friday night with a lantern parade and band showcase in Davis Square neighborhoods. Then, on Saturday, over 25 bands take over Davis Square for a giant music and dance party, followed by a parade of musicians and local activist groups on Sunday. This event is a great opportunity to engage with members of the Boston community while enjoying live musical performances and the beautiful fall weather. 




Free Admission to the ICA

The Institute of Contemporary Art, normally closed on Mondays, will open on Columbus Day and offer free admission. This is a great opportunity to visit the ICA Watershed, the museum's seasonal space in East Boston, before it closes for the winter. On Monday visitors at the ICA can participate in special events and activities (like art making and short films) as well as view all of the museum's current exhibitions. This is a perfect time to visit the museum if you haven't been able to make your way there on a Thursday when museum admission is normally free.

 


The Manhattan Short Film Festival, an annual film festival of international short films, received thousands of entries from more than 70 countries this year. Of those entries, on 9 finalists were chosen. These 9 films were then screened over 1,000 times in theaters in more than 250 cities on six continents between September 27th and October 7th. On October 6th, those in the Boston area have the opportunity to see these films during a screening at the Museum of Fine Arts. Viewers are invited not only to watch the films but also to judge them! On entry to the theater, you are given a ballot card to vote for your favorite short film and actor. Your votes are sent to Manhattan Short's headquarters and the winner will be announced on Monday! You can watch the event trailer here. 



Spend your day off exploring Boston's Fenway neighborhood at the Opening Our Doors Event sponsored by the Fenway Alliance. Enjoy free activities like a neighborhood walking tour, live musical performances, art installations, an interactive community mural, craft making, and a rhythm and dance parade. The event begins at 10:00 am at 200 Huntington Avenue/Avenue of the Arts with a performance by Boston's Children's Chorus, a New Orleans-style front line parade, and free cupcakes from Oakleaf Cakes! Following the event kick-off, a complimentary trolley will bring attendees to activities at key locations such as Evans Way Park and the Museum of Fine Arts. 

We hope you take advantage of this holiday to explore Boston and are we are excited to see how you'll spend your day off.  Share your long weekend activities with by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Get Your Fill of Fine Arts This Weekend

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, September 24, 2018

Checking out Boston's music and art scene is a must-do during your immersion experience in the city. You might not know it, but Boston has a lot of free (or inexpensive) events celebrating the arts. This weekend, consider exploring Boston's fine art attractions outside of a traditional museum, and learn more about the city through art, film, and music! 

Music: The Boston Pops (Free Concert)

What better way to spend your Sunday than at a free concert put on by the world-famous Boston Pops! The Pops will perform a special free concert at Franklin Park as part of the Park's community arts festival. Aside from the concert, the festival will have other fun, interactive events, such as mural painting, an instrument playground, crafts, a photo booth, live animal demonstrations and more!

When: Sunday, September 30th, 3 pm - 7 pm (The Playstead at Franklin Park) 

Music: The Beyonce and Coldplay Experience 

Do you prefer pop to classical music? What about pop music mixed with science? If that sounds intriguing, consider spending your Saturday night at the Museum of Science to experience the popular music of your favorite artists, fused with stunning visuals under the Charles Hayden Planetarium dome. This is not your average listening party! Hear hits by Beyoncé or Coldplay as you are taken on a “sensory journey full of innovation, artistry, and imagination.”

When: Coldplay: Saturday, September 29th, 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm, Beyonce: Saturday, September 29th, 8:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Film: The Boston Latino International Film Festival (BLIFF)

Throughout the year, Boston hosts a variety of interesting and eye-opening international film festivals, and the BLIFF is no exception. This celebration of Latin culture will feature documentaries as well as full length and short films that explore Latino-related topics. The film festival is an exciting opportunity to get a glimpse of Latino culture through the eyes of members of the Latino community in the United States and other Spanish speaking countries. 28 films will be screened at 4 different locations around the city, this Thursday through Sunday. Admission is free!

When: Thursday, Sep 27th, 7:00 pm - Sunday, Sep 30th, 9:00 pm

 

Art: SoWa Artists Market

Every Sunday, the artist studios in Boston's SoWa district open to the public at the SoWa Open Market. The South End becomes busy with artists showcasing their work and art lovers browsing their studios to find that special piece. On Harrison Avenue, four floors of artist studios are open, displaying paintings, sculptures, drawings, and other crafts. While you're at visiting the artist studios, be sure to check out the SoWa farmers market or food trucks bazaar, after a long morning of art spectating, you'll be hungry for lunch!

When: Sunday, September 30th, 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Art: Boston's Women's Market 

Boston's Women's Market is celebrating its one year anniversary! This market, located in the Seaport District, showcases work made strictly by local female artists and entrepreneurs. Shoppers can find everything from jewelry, to candles, to body lotions, ceramics, clothes and more. Come to support New England's inspiring female entrepreneurs and stay to explore Seaport and the sights along Boston's beautiful waterfront. 

When: Sunday, September 30th, 12:30 pm - 4:30 pm (District Hall - 75 Northern Ave, Boston)

We hope you see or hear something interesting this weekend! Share all your adventures with us by using #HomestayBoston!

Exploring Boston Trails

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, August 21, 2018


Are you interested in walking or biking along Boston's beautiful scenery? Learning about Boston's intriguing history? Whether you want to take a simple stroll or get your steps in for the day, check out some of these trails!


The Freedom Trail: Follow a red, brick trail through Boston that goes past 16 Revolutionary War landmarks. Walk past the site of the Boston Massacre, the Old North Church, famous burial grounds, where the Boston Tea Party began, Kings Chapel, the Old South Meeting Hall, Paul Revere's Statue and the Bunker Hill monument. 2.5 miles of rich history along this popular trail.


The Emerald Necklace: Walk through 7 miles of  green designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park in New York City. The trail starts at the Boston Common and ends at Franklin Park. It passes by Jamaica Pond and the Arnold Arboretum. 


Minuteman Trail: Learn about the Revolutionary War through this historic trail. Walk along where Paul Revere rode his 'Midnight Ride' in 1775 and see battle grounds such as Meadow Grounds, Tower Park and the Munroe Tavern. This 10 mile trail also has a railroad history from the mid 1800's. The trail connects Cambridge to Bedford starting at Alewife Station and ending at South Road. People use this trail to commute to work on bike as its well-known around the area.

Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway: If you're downtown exploring, take a quick 2 mile walk starting at the North End Park, ending at the Chinatown Park. Along the way, check out Paul Revere's house, a carousel, gardens and public art. This trail was named after President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy and Senator Ted Kennedy's mother, Rose F. Kennedy. This trail is accessible by the MBTA through the Aquarium Station, Haymarket Station and South Station.


Southwest Corridor Park / Pierre Lallement Bike Path: Want to walk or bike through Boston? Check out this 4 mile, popular commuter trail for cyclists that runs through the city and runs along Boston's skyscrapers. The path is named after the inventor of the pedal bicycle, Pierre Lallement in 1860. Starting from Dartmouth Street off Mass Turnpike I-90, the path spans through New Washington Street in Jamaica Plain.

South Bay Harbor Trail: Nearly 4 miles, starting at Melnea Cass Blvd. adjacent from Ruggles Station and ending at Pier 4, near the Institution of Contemporary Art, this trail connects many Boston neighborhoods together. Accessible through the MBTA, this trail also includes the Harborwalk displaying Boston's waterfront.

North Bank Bridge: A gorgeous 1/2 mile walk, perfect for Instagram photo opportunities on the bridge over looking Boston. Connecting North Point Park in Cambridge to Paul Revere Park in Charlestown, the path goes underneath the Zakim bridge and above the MBTA tracks.

Want to find more trails to explore? Click here for more Boston trails and here for all Massachusetts trails. 


How Do You Say...?

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, July 20, 2018

For the non-native English speakers in America, I imagine it's tricky. Have you thought about how we pronounce the same thing differently or have multiple names for the same object?


Here are some things America disagrees on...

  • Is it firefly or lightning bug?
  • Tennis shoes or sneakers?
  • Hair tie, hair elastic, hair band, ponytail holder or hair bow?
  • Y'all or you guys?
  • Soda, pop or coke? 
  • Water fountain or bubbler?
  • Sub, grinder or hoagie?
  • Lollipop or sucker?
  • Dinner or supper?
  • Garage sale or yard sale?
  • Crawfish, crayfish or crawdad?
  • Rotary, roundabout or traffic circle?

Words with a different regional pronunciations: crayon, aunt, mayonnaise, syrup, caramel, pajamas, cauliflower and route

Check out a full list with maps here and here.

For foreigners, American English can be confusing because usually the variation of a word someone uses is common in the area where they're are from. For example, if you are on the east coast, you might say sneakers, but on the west coast you might say tennis shoes.

Play a quiz here to determine which region you're from based on your vocabulary!

    

The Bostonian language is even more complicated. Between the thick accent that excludes the letter "r" and the sayings, it can be hard to understand. Basically in words, you replace "r" with "ah".  Some common slang phrases are...

Wicked - extremely or very such as "wicked awesome"

Down the Cape - Cape Cod

Dunkies / Dunks - Dunkin Donuts

Spa - convenience corner store

The Hub - Boston (Beantown)

Bang a U-ie - turn

Bubbler - water fountain

Pahlah - parlor meaning living room

Chowdah - clam chowder

cellah - cellar / basement

clickah - clicker / TV remote control

Jimmie's - sprinkles

Frappe - milkshake

No suh - no sir / no way

the Hill - Beacon Hill

the Vineyard - Martha's Vineyard


Take a quiz to test your Boston slang knowledge here.

For a full list of words check out the unofficial Boston dictionary here.

Click here to hear an authentic Bostonian accent and click here for a clip from James Corden and Matt Damon.

Whether you're a native speaker or a learner, good luck at understanding the American English and especially the Bostonian language!

Happy National Ice Cream Day!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, July 12, 2018

                                                                           

National Ice Cream Day is this Sunday, July 15th!

Ever curious about the difference between soft serve vs. regular ice cream? Here's a little history lesson on the two:

   

Soft Serve 

Who doesn't love the soft, smooth and creamy taste of soft serve ice cream? It was originally invented in 1934 by Tom Carvel after his ice cream truck broke down in Hartsdale, New York.  His ice cream melted, yet customers still bought it. Carvel realized a lighter version of ice cream was a brilliant business idea. He created a secret recipe and opened a store called Carvel  within two years. Dairy Queen  had similar ideas when developing a soft serve recipe in 1938 in Moline, IL.  In a sample tasting of their new product, 1,600 servings were consumed within two hours. Still today, soft serve is a hit among ice cream lovers. It is lower in milk fat and stored at a lower temperature than regular ice cream.  Soft serve is up to 45% air in volume which gives it the fluffiness that melts in your mouth.

Regular Ice Cream 

Variations of ice cream can be traced back centuries to the ancient world.  It began in China around 200 BC where they used a mixture of milk, rice and snow. In 400 BC, Persians ate ice flavored with fruit and rose water. At this time in Ancient Greece, snow with honey and fruit was served at markets in Athens. In Rome, Emperors carried ice from mountains to combine it with fruit. During the sixteenth century, Mughal Emperors in India had ice transported to make fruit sorbets. By the 1600's, ice cream became popular in Europe appearing in recipes in French cookbooks. Ice cream finally reached North America by the mid 1700's as it was introduced by Quaker colonists. Fast forward to the 1840's and ice cream makers were invented in England and America by Agnes Marshall and Nancy Johnson. Today, the average American eats anywhere from 19-23 pounds of ice cream annually. It contains at least 10% milk fat and 16% sweeteners. 12% is milk and 55% is water.



    

Looking for the BEST ice cream in Boston?

There's obviously the infamous Ben & Jerry's,  Emack and Bolio's, and J. P. Lick's, but what about some other local shops?  Here are a few to try around Boston: Gracie's Ice Cream, Christinia's Homemade Ice Cream, Forge Ice Cream Bar,  Lizzy's Ice Cream, Tipping Cow Ice Cream,  BerryLine, Amorino, Toscanini's, Cold Stone Creamery, Juicy Spot Cafe, Blackbird Doughnuts,  Molly Moo's Ice Cream and Cafe.  

Looking for non-dairy options? Try FoMu which serves dairy free ice cream, vegan, gluten free, soy free and kosher sweets.

For more detailed information and the top 10 list check out these links below:

https://www.bostonmagazine.com/restaurants/2018/06/29/best-boston-ice-cream/

https://boston.eater.com/maps/best-new-ice-cream-boston

     

Craving Gelato and the Italian experience

Head to the North End to be transported to Italy to enjoy some delicious gelato.  During the summer, you can stroll the streets of the North End while enjoying a cone without the airfare!  Click here for a list of places in the North End where you can find the best gelato.

Fun Facts about Ice Cream

  • Chocolate ice cream was invented before vanilla
  • Vanilla is the most popular ice cream flavor
  • In Norway, the record for the tallest ice cream cone was over 10 feet tall
  • 90 % of American's have ice cream in their freezer
  • New Zealand consumes the most ice cream
  • A record holding 1.75 gallons of ice cream was eaten in eight minutes 
  • Some of the strangest ice cream flavors are lobster, octopus, horseradish and raw horse flesh... ew!

Whether you're chilling at home or out at the beach, we hope you beat the heat and celebrate a day for eating ice cream!

   


International Summer Festivals

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, May 29, 2018

June 22nd will be the longest day of the year. The Summer Solstice signifies the first official day of summer in the United States and the start of what will hopefully be a period of warmer weather in Boston! The meaning of the Summer Solstice varies across cultures, though many recognize the start of summer with special holidays, festivals or rituals. While the United States does not have a popular holiday related to the start of summer, other areas of the world have specific cultural traditions that celebrate the Summer Solstice. Here is how some countries welcome the start of the summer season.

Kupala Night

Kupala Night is a celebration observed in countries with Slavic ancestry such as Ukraine, Russia, Poland, and Belarus. The festival signifies the end of the summer solstice and the start of the harvest season. During this festival participants build fires that they then jump over to demonstrate bravery and strength. A strong theme of the festival is love, and couples will jump over the fire while holding hands to prove that their relationship will last. Additionally, women will float flower wreathes in rivers, which men then try to capture, in the hope of also capturing the interest of the woman who floated the wreath. A sinking wreath is considered a predication of loneliness while a floating wreath indicates the prospect of love. Some participants will also search through the woods for the mythical "fern flower", which is thought to bring good fortune if found, although botanical experts do not believe that this flower actually exists. Historically, this search was an excuse for unmarried couples to spend alone time together without a chaperone, though today is done just for fun. While the festival has Pagan roots it has been incorporated into the Christian calendar as "St. Johns Eve" however, it still contains Pagan elements such as fortune telling rituals and the wearing of flower crowns. Many of these traditions are customary to rural areas as the holiday has been given a more modern twist is major cities where fireworks and concerts are also held.


Midsummer

At the start of the Swedish holiday of Midsummer, many Swedes head to the country side to begin their five week summer vacation.  On Midsummer's Eve (usually a Friday between the 19th and 25th of June) cities essentially shut down as many businesses close and streets are deserted. Families gather together in the country and have large celebrations complete with traditional dances around a may pole and crafting flower wreathes and other decorations. A typical midsummer meal is a variety of pickled herring and potatoes as well as grilled salmon or ribs followed by strawberries for desert. After dinner many Swedes go out dancing. Midsummer is also a popular time for weddings or christenings. Despite the fact thatSwedes are not particularly religious, many people want to get married at a country church during this time of year.


The Duanwu Festival

The Duanwu Festival, known in the West as the "Dragon Boat Festival", is a traditional Chinese holiday that takes place each year near the summer solstice.The festival is also often called the "Double Fifth Festival" as it takes place on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Lunar Calendar. This year the festival will take place from June 16th to 18th. The Festival celebrates Chinese poet Qu Yuan, who is considered to be a martyr in the country. Qu Yaun was a member of the ruling house in the ancient state of Chu.  He drowned himself when the powerful Chinese state of Qin captured Ying, the Chu capital. The story of Qu Yuan describes how local admirers of Qu raced out on boats to try to save him. When they could not find Qu, they dropped balls of sticky rice into the river so that fish would eat them instead of Qu's body. This is the origin of Duanwu's dragon boat races and the reason why people snack on "zongzi", or sticky rice balls, during this holiday.

Boston will hold its own Dragon Boat Festival this summer. The 39th Annual Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival will take place over the weekend of June 9th - 10th and feature Dragon Boat races as well as performances, art, and food.


The Bon Festival

Japan's Bon Festival, or Obon, occurs this year on August 13th - 15th. The three day celebration honors Japanese ancestors and has become an opportunity for families to reunite and spend time together. During the festival people hang lanterns outside their houses to help guide their dead ancestors back home. Families will also visit and clean the graves of loved ones who have died. Perhaps the most significant tradition of the Bon Festival is the Bon Odori, a traditional folk dance that welcomes the spirit of the dead. The dance is different in each region with songs a lyrics specific to that area.

Boston will also host Obon celebrations this summer. Historically Japanese schools such as Boston Higashi School and Showa Boston will each have their own Bon Festival featuring music, dancing, and Japanese food.

Source: WikipediaCulture Trip, Meet the Slavs, Sweden.se, Colorzine


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