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August 2019 Festivals

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, August 09, 2019

African Festival of Boston




Saturday, August 10th from 10am - 7pm at the Boston Commons Park join the African Festival of Boston. This event is FREE and open to the public! Learn about African heritage through music, dancing and fun! For more information click here

India Day Festival


Saturday, August 17th from 3 - 8pm go to City Hall Plaza to attend the India Day Festival! This FREE event features Indian music, food and dance to celebrate Indian Independence Day. Enjoy and learn about Indian culture at this festival. Click here for more information.

Fort Point Festival

Sunday, August 18th from 12 - 5pm head to Thomson Place and Stillings Street for the Fort Point Festival! This street party is FREE with music, games, dancing, food and yoga! Hear a Prince tribute band, play cornhole and pose at the photobooth! This is the festival’s 2nd year and it’s going to be bigger than last year! Click here for more information.

Illuminate the Harbor Fireworks Celebration

Thursday, August 29th from 8:30 - 9pm enjoy fireworks at the 7th annual Illuminate the Harbor Fireworks Celebration. Fireworks can be seen from Christopher Columbus Park in the North End, Piers Park in East Boston and Fan Pier in the Seaport District. This FREE event celebrates summer, the city and the community. There will be live music at Christopher Columbus Park starting at 6:30pm. For more details, click here.

Boston Jazz Festival

Friday, August 30th and Saturday, the 31st check out the Boston Jazz Festival at Maritime Park in the Seaport! This event is FREE and full of live performers starting at 12pm! There’s plenty of food, music and fun to enjoy as this is their 9th year of the festival. Jazz originates in the United States with African American roots and this festival showcases everything from the classic to contemporary. For more information click here.

Explore Boston: Neighborhoods North

Global Immersions Recruiting - Sunday, August 04, 2019

In our Explore Boston series: Neighborhoods we will highlight and explore some of the neighborhoods and towns where our hosts call home.
Towns located north of the city are some of the most beautiful and historical of New England. Explore colonial lifestyles, beautiful waterfronts, and amazing cuisine. This blog takes us to the following neighborhoods: Winthrop, Everett, East Boston, and Charlestown.


Winthrop:

Located just north of Boston, Winthrop is another typical New England town. Winthrop was originally settled in 1630 by English Puritans. The town was named after John Winthrop who was the second governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Today the town is almost 20,000 people! If you have the chance to visit Winthrop, make sure to visit the Deer Island Harborwalk. There are miles of trail to explore with views overlooking Boston and the Harbor Islands, landing airplanes, and the ocean. From Winthrop, you can also see Nix’s Mate which is an island in the Boston Harbor where pirates would hang enemies as a warning to sailors. Check our list of favorite Winthrop restaurants here.



Everett:

Located in Middlesex County, Everett is a small city located just north of the city of Boston founded in 1870. Full of history, Everett is named after a former president of Harvard University, Edward Everett, who also served as the United States Secretary of State in 1853. The small city has two claims to fame. First, Everett is the home city of the Leavitt Corporation, known for their Teddie brand peanut butter! Second, for those who are fans of Grey’s Anatomy, Everett is the home town of Ellen Pompeo who plays Meredith on the TV show. Everett is also well known for its nightlife with its locally owned pubs and breweries. The town also borders the water if you are looking for views of the Mystic River! On rainy days, make sure to check out SkyZone Trampoline Park located on Norman Street. Your friends and family will love it. Finally, if you have time for a bite to eat, make sure to stop by Texas Roadhouse and Abbondanza as you explore the city!



Fondly referred to as Eastie, the town of East Boston has personality, character, and deep cultural roots. Historically, East Boston was a shipbuilding town and home to immigrants from around the globe including Irish, Russians Jews, Italians, and later many Latinos. The Kennedy family even lived in East Boston for some time! Eastie has the advantage of being close to the city while having its own vibrant culture. First and foremost, East Boston is home to Logan International Airport accommodating quick and easy travel. Eastie is also home to some of the most beautiful waterfronts of Greater Boston where you can find stunning views of the city skyline. Piers Park is also a treasured wonder of Eastie where you can explore around the greenery as well as the sailing yard. If you have time to walk around town, make sure to visit Belle Isle Marsh and Constitution (Shay’s) Beach to fill your natural scenery fix! Last but not least, East Boston is home to some of the best and most diverse restaurants in the City. Angela’s Cafe, Mi Pueblito, Rino’s Place, and Santarpio’s are known local favorites. For a complete list of recommended restaurants, click here.

Charlestown is located between the Mystic and Charles Rivers, which means beautiful waterfront views and fresh cool breezes. Established in the 1600s, Charlestown is one of America’s most historical and traditional towns. Its roots are deeply intertwined with the American Revolution. Today, the community is close-knit and family friendly, making it a perfect place to explore for a few days! When you visit, make sure to start your adventure on the Freedom Trail as it weaves through the history of the town. Also on your list is the USS Constitution Museum and the Charlestown Navy Yard to learn more about our country’s naval history. Charlestown is also home to Bunker Hill Monument where you can enjoy the beautiful green scenery while recognizing the famous battle. While walking around the town center, make sure to explore both Main Street and City Square for all of your dining and shopping needs! Also, stop in Warren Tavern, Massachusetts' oldest bar, where even George Washington dined after its opening in 1780. If you are looking for other great local cuisine, refer to our list here.

Explore Boston: Neighborhoods South

Global Immersions Recruiting - Saturday, July 20, 2019

Aside from Boston’s most touristy neighborhoods, there are great suburbs to explore! In our Explore Boston series: Neighborhoods we will highlight and explore some of the neighborhoods and towns where our hosts call home. This blog takes us to the following neighborhoods: Hyde Park, Roslindale, Jamaica Plain and Mattapan.


Hyde Park:

Hyde Park is commonly named “A Small Town in the City.” The town has its own charm to offer. If you have the chance to explore around Hyde Park, make sure to head to Cleary Square for food stops, storefronts, and historical landmarks. In the square you will find the Vertullo Building. Built in 1868, the Vertullo Building is a must-see in Hyde Park as it is the only surviving wooden commercial building in the area! Nearby you will find Everett Square Theatre. Built in 1915, the theatre was originally used as an artistic space for theatre, musical, and other live performances. The town is now working to restore and renovate the historical building. If you are looking for outdoor activities away from city life, Hyde Park is also close to Blue Hills and Stony Brook Reservation where you can enjoy beautiful New England foliage and scenery. Finally, if you are looking for a bite to eat in HP, check out Ron’s Ice Cream (for both your bowling and ice cream needs) as well as Tutto Italiano, and the Fairmount Grille. Click here for a list of other recommended restaurants nearby.



Mattapan:

The neighborhood of Mattapan is located between Dorchester, Milton, and Hyde Park. The neighborhood was originally a predominantly Jewish neighborhood and since the 1980s has gained large Haitian, African, and Caribbean populations making for diverse people, food, and culture! If you have the chance to walk around, the first place on your list should be Mattapan Square! This marks the center of the town where Blue Hill Avenue, River Street, and Cummins highway intersect. Here you will find the most commercial (not residential) part of the neighborhood with shops and small businesses. If you continue down Blue Hill Avenue, you will find many “Triple-Decker” homes which are quintessential to Mattapan amongst other Victorian and brick style houses. The neighborhood is also well known for the historic Mattapan Trolley. This antique train, although slower at times, serves as a connector to the Red Line at Ashmont. For a Boston neighborhood, Mattapan is filled with more green spaces than most including the Harambee Park, the Franklin Park Zoo, the Boston Nature and Wildlife Sanctuary, the Clark Cooper Community Gardens, and Forest Hill cemetery. Mattapan is also home to one of the Boston Public Library branches! Lastly, here are some of Mattapan’s favorite restaurants.



Roslindale:

Fondly referred to as Rozzie, Roslindale is a beautiful quaint suburb in southern Boston surrounded by hills and dales between Jamaica Plain and West Roxbury. The neighborhood was officially annexed by Boston in 1873. The most famous place to visit in Roslindale is Roslindale Village where you will find shops, stores, and restaurants! Here are some of our favorite places to eat including Romano’s Pizzeria and Taqueria, Fornax Bread Company, and Redd’s in Rozzie. If you are looking for some natural scenery, make sure to explore the neighboring south end of Arnold Arboretum or Adam’s Park for Roslindale community events. From June until November, there is also a Roslindale Farmer’s Market on Saturdays for all to enjoy.


Jamaica Plain:

Jamaica Plain, or JP, is a neighborhood filled with artists, activists, young professionals, and families. The most popular spot to check out is Centre Street. There you will find the neighborhood’s locally owned shops and restaurants known for the best thrift shopping and delicious food. Some of our favorite restaurants in the area include Tres Gatos, Ten Tables, Doyle’s Cafe (for Tuesday night trivia), and JP Licks. Make sure to walk through City Feed and Supply, Jamaica Plain’s very own local market, to purchase organic food and community goods. If you are a thrift shopper, 40 South Street will be up your alley! For those interested in art, make sure to walk to the MFA or Isabella Stewart Gardner. Finally, if you are looking for parks and nature walks, JP is just for you. Part of Boston’s Emerald Necklace, visitors can enjoy the views of Jamaica Pond, Arnold Arboretum, and Forest Hill Cemetery. There is something for everyone to enjoy!


Upcoming Boston Food Festivals

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, July 10, 2019



Are you a pizza lover? From 12pm - 8pm on Saturday July 13 and Sunday July 14 head to the Boston Pizza Festival at Boston City Hall Plaza. Be prepared for live music, pizza acrobats, pizza tossing stations and more entertainment. With 30 pizzerias, there are endless amounts of options including vegan and gluten free options! Tickets are on sale and only $15 for an excellent experience of taste testing handmade pizzas! Click here for more information.




Donut Fest is coming on Sunday, July 28 from 11am - 6pm at Underground Ink Block. You’ll find 10 different donut vendors, food & ice cream trucks, live music, giveaways, Instagram backdrops, and much more entertainment! There are donuts for everyone, with even gluten free and vegan options available. Tickets start at only $12 for this delicious donut filled event! Click here for more information.



Craving a plate full of fresh, local seafood? Check out the Boston Seafood Festival from 11 am - 6pm on Sunday, August 4 at the Boston Fish Pier. This is their 8th year of sharing spectacular seafood with the Boston area. The festival features live chef demos, a fish cutting contest, “Battle of the Shuckers”, outstanding food from over 15 vendors, and much more! Tickets are only $15 for a day filled with sensational seafood. Click here for more information.


Explore Boston: Chinatown and Dim Sum

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, May 28, 2019


Like all neighborhoods in Boston, Chinatown has a fascinating history built on the foundations of hard working immigrants and fervent culture. The South Cove, where Boston Chinatown now resides, was originally built in the 1840s on top of a landfill to establish railroads and row houses. Close to the industrial sector, the neighborhood became a hotspot for new immigrants such as the Irish, the Germans, and the Jews. However, by 1870, there was a flood of young male Chinese immigrants. The majority of Chinese immigrants set up laundry shops and lived in their workplace alone. As a result of the Chinese Exclusion Act, families of the workers were unable to come to America. Thus the men would work all day and send their earnings back home to China to support their families there. As more and more Chinese immigrants continued to flood into the community, the neighborhood was officially recognized as Chinatown by the 1880s.



The community continued to grow into the beginnings of the 20th century. Laundry shops were still the most common workplace, followed by restaurants, nightclubs, and the opium trade. Many Chinese-Americans volunteered and fueled the war efforts, eventually resulting in the abolition of the Chinese Exclusion Act. By the mid-20th century, spirits were high as Chinatown began to fill with women, children, and families. In 1965, the Immigration Reform Act was put into place which eradicated previous immigration quotas. Once again Chinatown experienced more growth as more Chinese came, including families and university-educated intellectuals from cities like Hong Kong. During this influx of residents, social organizations such as the Chinese American Civic Association and the South Cove Community Health Center were established and expanded to serve the growing population.



By the 1990s, many young Chinese scholars took refuge in the neighborhood under the Chinese Student Protection Act following the Tiananmen Square massacre. Most educated individuals end up in high tech industries while working class individuals often work in the Chinatown restaurant industries forming the backbone foundation of the local economy. Today, Chinatown is one of the must see neighborhoods in Boston with its delicious food, infamous festivals, and vibrant culture.



If you are able to visit Chinatown in 2019, make sure to leave time in your schedule for a Dim Sum meal! Literally translated to mean “touch the heart,” Dim Sum is a traditional Chinese meal of made of small plates of savory or sweet treats, tea, and shared with close company. Traditional dishes include varieties of tea and often steamed buns such as roasted pork buns, steamed rice dumplings, beef noodle rolls, or fried sesame balls. Each dish is served in portions meant for 3-4 people. It is recommended you order many different dishes to split amongst the table! Dim Sum has recently become popularized in the United States and other western cultures, but the best spots are still found in your local Chinatown. Here are some of the best restaurants in Boston to try Dim Sum! You will find that Dim Sum served here is similar to Chinese cuisine for brunch, while the traditional cultures in Hong Kong and the Guangdong Province may serve the meal at any time throughout the day.



Although Americanized Dim Sum is different from the traditional meal in China, there are many customs that still the same. When eating Dim Sum, here are a few tips to remember! First, make sure to take small bites and eat slowly in order to maximize the delectable homemade flavors. Similarly, in Dim Sum, the less soy sauce you use, the better, as it masks the true flavor of the dish. Second, make sure to keep your chopsticks to yourself. Although serving others may be well-intended, it is most polite to keep your own utensils to yourself to minimize germs. However, there is one exception: when receiving the kettle for tea, make sure to serve others around you before yourself! Click here to learn more Do’s and Don’ts of Dim Sum!


As always, we want to see your favorite Chinatown and Dim Sum experiences in Boston! Share with us @globalimmersions or by using #HomestayBoston.


History of Ice Cream in America

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, May 16, 2019


Ice cream has been part of the American culture since our Founding Fathers built our nation! Records by New York Merchants show that George Washington spent $200 alone on ice cream in the summer of 1790. He even had a 306 piece ice cream serving set in the home used when entertaining his guests. What’s more, Thomas Jefferson is credited with introducing the first ice cream recipe to the United States after tasting the frozen treat earlier in France. He had ice boxes installed at his estate, Monticello, so that he could serve ice cream all year long! Ultimately ice cream was reserved for the elite until around 1800 when insulated ice houses were invented, which helped to popularize the treat for the masses. Even immigrants coming to Ellis Island were often given ice cream as their first taste of America!




The American ice cream industry took off in 1851 with the help of milk dealer, Jacob Fussell. From there, as technologies involving refrigeration, mechanization, automobile distribution, and pasteurization advanced, ice cream rates of production and consumption skyrocketed! Consumption rates were at an all time high at the beginning of Prohibition as the people substituted one vice for another (alcohol to ice cream) with a national consumption of 260 million gallons of ice cream in 1920! Later on after World War II, we celebrated the end of the war by eating ice cream with returning troops after the dairy product ration was lifted. That is just about as patriotic as it gets. In the 1980's in the lingerings of the Cold War, Ronald Reagan declared the month of July, National Ice Cream Month, as a way to lift the morale of the American people. Today, the average American consumes more than 45 pints of ice cream per year, which equates to around $10 billion in frozen dairy consumption both in the winters and summers. It is safe to say that ice cream and the American culture go hand in hand.



If you have ever had American ice cream, you know that we take our toppings and flavors very seriously. One of the leading American ice cream brands, Ben and Jerry’s, boasts of having more than 54 flavors currently available for consumer purchase ranging from plain vanilla to pistachio to strawberry cheesecake. And there are so many ways to eat ice cream too! We eat hard ice cream, soft serve, milkshakes, cones to choose from, ice cream trucks, ice cream parlors, and more. Many ice cream shops have topping bars that may include hot fudge, caramel, sprinkles, cookies, candies, etc. Choose your favorite combination or switch it up every time! Lucky for you, Boston has some of the best ice cream parlors in the country. Click here for our favorite places in the city for ice cream!

Which Boston ice cream place is your favorite? Share with us @globalimmersions or by using #HomestayBoston!


Sources: NPR, Boston, IDFA, Washington


Explore Boston: The South End

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, May 01, 2019


Close to downtown but not too crowded, the South End of Boston is one of our favorite places to explore in the city! Referred to as SoWA (which stands for South of Washington Street), the South End is full of art, creativity, and vibrancy. The neighborhood is beautiful to explore by foot this time of year with historic brownstone architecture, quaint boutiques, parks in full bloom, and delicious bistros around every corner!


To truly appreciate the authenticity that is the South End, one needs to understand its remarkable history as well. Parts of the modern day South End, just like the Back Bay neighborhood, were originally under water! Downtown Boston, near the seaport, was connected to the mainland, to towns like Roxbury, via a strip of land referred to as the neck. As the city became busier, the city of Boston began to build up more land surrounding the neck in 1829, which eventually created the South End! The neighborhood originally was home to many middle upper class families in the latter half of the 19th century. As cheaper housing became available near streets like Columbus, the South End experienced periods of bankruptcy and crime. However, in the 1970s the city of Boston introduced redevelopment and renovation efforts to return SoWA to its former glory! Today the South End is home to artists, young professionals, and other Bostonians.



The best way to explore the South End is to walk around on foot! You will find dog parks, beautiful gardens, and most notably, breathtaking historical architecture. Here is a list of landmarks to keep an eye out for and arranged walking tours of the neighborhood. If you are lucky enough to explore the South End in the spring and summer months, make sure to visit one of the many outdoor markets such as the South End Open Market, the SoWA Vintage Market, and the SoWA Farmer’s Market. This weekend, May 3rd, 4th, and 5th SoWA will be hosting its 15th annual Art Walk where local artists and galleries will open their doors and new exhibits to all who can stop by! See what other upcoming events the SoWA Art & Design District is offering here.



In addition to its art scene, the South End is well known for its award winning restaurants! From jazz clubs, to pizza parlors, to french bistros, the South End has a taste of it all. If you want to live the life of a true millennial Bostonian, head to the South End for weekend brunch. Most places are located along the streets of Columbus, Tremont, and Washington. These are some of our favorite restaurants and brunch spots in the neighborhood.


We want to see where you decide to explore! Share your favorite South End moments with us @globalimmersions or by using #HomestayBoston.


Explore Boston: The North End

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, April 18, 2019


As warm spring weather approaches and you are looking for places to explore around Boston, make sure to include the North End on your list! Filled with a rich cultural history and heartwarming cuisine, the “Little Italy” of Boston has pastimes that everyone can enjoy.



The North End has a fascinating history beginning in the 1600s when British settlers came to the area. The neighborhood was originally home to Puritan craftsmen and in the 1800s later evolved into a wealthy neighborhood where those belonging to the mercantile and shipping industries resided. After the war, many of the British returned home and shortly after the North End became a beacon for immigrants coming to Boston. Many Irish came in the 1840s, followed by the Jewish, and finally the Italians in the 1860s. Soon the Italians dominated the neighborhood with their large families and cultural presence; by 1930 the North End was almost completely Italian. The same family lineages, culture, language, cuisine, and customs can be found in the neighborhood today!



When we think of the North End, we think of incredible Italian food. From mom and pop pasta recipes, to fresh handmade pizzas, to the best dining service, the Little Italy of Boston has it all.  Check out this list of the best restaurants to try during your visit! Don’t feel like a full meal? Make sure to try out the area’s local bakeries, too! The neighborhood is especially known for its cannolis; Mike’s Pastry and Modern Pastry are some of Bostonian locals’ favorites.



Located right near the seaport and walking distance from the financial district, the North End is a perfect neighborhood to explore while walking around downtown. If you tour the Freedom Trail, you will definitely pass through! The neighborhood is home to many historical sites as well, such as the Paul Revere House, the Old North Church, St. Stephen’s church, the Holocaust memorial, and more. If you feel up for walking a bit further, add the USS Constitution museum, Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park, and the Harborwalk to your North End exploration. The North End is a perfect blend of Boston’s old and new!


Make sure to share with us your favorite North End moments by tagging @globalimmersions or using #HomestayBoston.

Source: NorthEndBoston, Boston Magazine, Timeout

Boston Red Sox Opening Season

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, April 02, 2019

Happy April everyone! Spring has officially arrived in Boston. The sun is shining, people want to be outside, and most importantly... The Boston Red Sox baseball team season has begun! Watching a ball game in Fenway Park, the oldest Major League Baseball stadium in use, is known as one of the greatest American traditions. Today we want to share with you some of our favorite Fenway Park and American baseball traditions. After winning the World Series last year, the Red Sox are expected to be one of the most competitive teams in the MLB this 2019 season. The Red Sox home opener at Fenway Park will take place on Monday, April 9 against the Toronto Blue Jays! Click here for more about the season schedule and ticket purchasing!



In order to fully experience a game at Fenway Park, you must be familiar with these two songs: Sweet Caroline and Take Me Out to the Ball Game. Most important is Sweet Caroline, by Neil Diamond. The song is now played at every Red Sox home game in the middle of every eighth inning since 2002! The whole crowd stands and sings in unison as a way to encourage and cheer on their favorite Boston team as the game comes to a close. The next song, Take Me Out to the Ball Game, is an important song to know if you are a spectator at any ball game in America. Written in 1908, the song is commonly referred to as the National Anthem of baseball and sung during the seventh-inning stretch by fans of both teams.


Now, I am sure you are wondering, “What snacks can I get at a baseball game?” The average MLB game will last around 2-3 hours, and with up to nine innings, you have plenty of time to try some of these delicious stadium treats. First up to bat, are Cracker Jacks! An icon of American baseball, Cracker Jacks are a crunchy mixture of caramel, peanuts, and popcorn, often with a prize inside. Another classic stadium treat are hot dogs - Fenway Frank. They have lots of toppings and are easy to eat with one hand while you ‘root for the home team’ with the other! Often times you will see vendors walking through the stands who will sell a variety of snacks to you. For Fenway ball games specifically, make sure you try the clam chowder and lobster rolls as they are best known in New England.

Finally, if you have the chance to go to Fenway, make sure to be aware of the Green Monster! What? They have a monster in the park? Well, not exactly. The Green Monster is a wall, a 37 feet high green wall to be exact, that stands 309 feet away from home plate. You will see it, it is impossible to miss. The wall is nicknamed ‘Green Monster’ as it is incredibly tricky to hit a home run over the wall due to its elevated height. Many players take this as a challenge, and Red Sox fans take pride in its difficulty. If you are lucky enough to get seats near the wall, make sure to touch it for good luck!


Fenway Park is an stadium that everyone should take the opportunity to experience. The stadium even offers guided tours every day from 9AM-5PM at your convenience. Make sure to explore the Fenway neighborhood, including the infamous and photoworthy Red Sox banner on Lansdowne Street, restaurants, and more! Want to support the Red Sox and Boston? Make sure to find apparel by clicking the link here.

Share your favorite Red Sox memories with us at #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

FREE Pancakes at IHOP 3/12/19!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Sunday, March 10, 2019

Happy National Pancake Day!

Head over to IHOP on Tuesday, March 12 to celebrate and get your FREE short stack of original buttermilk pancakes and donate to help children battling critical illnesses! Find your nearest IHOP and learn more here.

Do you know the history of Pancake Day? Last Tuesday, March 5, was also Shrove Tuesday. "Shrive" means for one to confess their sins. During the olden days, on the day before Lent, people would use all of their eggs, fat and butter to make pancakes since they would not be eating these foods over the next 6 weeks. Lent is the 40 days preceding Easter in Christian traditions where fasting and food abstaining occurs. Lent began this year on March 6 and ends April 18.


Around the world, different countries celebrate Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day in many ways! In some towns in the U.K., people have pancake races while flipping them in frying pans. In Denmark, the day is called Fastelavn, in which children dress up in costumes and eat Danish style buns. In Canada, their pancakes are filled with objects to predict the future as the ring finder will be married first, the thimble finder will be a seamstress/tailor, the name finder will be a carpenter and the coin finder will become rich. In France, Shrove Tuesday is known as Mardi Gras or "Fat Tuesday", but their pancake day is on February 2nd and called Candlemas. They eat crêpes which are believed to bring a year full of happiness, wealth, health and good crops. Whoever flips their pancake without dropping it on the ground, has good luck for the year. Let us know your Pancake Day traditions in the comments below!


Hosts: Try making pancakes from scratch with your students with this recipe from Food Network! TAG us in your Instagram pictures @globalimmersions and enjoy!


1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

2 large eggs, at room temperature

1 1/4 cups milk, at room temperature

1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed

Sources:

https://www.whyeaster.com/customs/shrovetuesday.shtml

http://blog.english-heritage.org.uk/pancake-day-traditions/

http://projectbritain.com/pancakeday/world.htm


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