English Chinese Spanish Japanese Korean Turkish

News and Announcements

Welcome to Boston Homestay - Doshisha High School Group!15-Jul-2018

A group of Japanese students from Doshisha High School arrived to homestay today for the next fo..

Happy 4th of July - Office Closed04-Jul-2018

Happy 4th of July! The office will be closed today and will reopen on Thursday at 8:30 am (EST)..


Best in Hospitality

Cherry Blossom Festival This Sunday!

Global Immersions - Thursday, April 26, 2012

Have you ever been to a Japanese cherry blossom festival before?

Stop by Copley Square Park on Sunday, April 29th, between 11 am-4 pm for some Japanese festivities! This will be the first Japanese-style festival in Boston. There will be plenty of food, games, and performances for you to enjoy!

You can find more information about the festival here!

We hope to see you there!

                    

Best Student Cities of 2012

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, April 23, 2012

For the year 2012, university ranking company QS has named Boston the third best student city worldwide.  The rating was based on a complex set of measures taken from public information, surveys and data, providing a new way of comparing the best cities around the world in which to be a student.


 Boston was awarded the third place spot due to its high-ranked institutions, quality of living, employer activity, and student mix. As the only US city in the top 10 list, Boston's many historic universities have earned it the nickname, 'The Athens of America'. Furthermore, as QS notes, “Boston combines the hustle and bustle of a major metropolis, and a happening arts, politics, and culture scene, with an abundance of green open space and the stunning autumnal colors for which New England is famous”.

For the entire list of Best Student Cities in the World, visit the QS website here

The 2012 Boston Marathon

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, April 13, 2012

This Monday, April 16th marks the 116th Boston Marathon. As the world’s oldest annual marathon, The Boston Marathon attracts over 20,000 runners and 500,000 spectators each year. The Marathon is New England’s most widely viewed sporting event each year, and runs through eight Massachusetts cities and towns: Hopkinton, Ashland, Framingham, Natick, Wellesley, Newton, Brookline, and Boston.


Originally a local event, The Boston Marathon’s fame and status now attracts runners from all over the world. Thousands of spectators line the sides of the course for the entire distance of the race to cheer the runners on, encourage them, and provide free water and snacks to any of the runners. The race is traditionally held on Patriot's Day, the third Monday in April, often referred to by local residents as "Marathon Monday."

For more information about the race, visit the Boston Athletic Association’s website here.


Sources:

baa.org
boston.com/marathon

Happy 100th Birthday Fenway Park!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, April 10, 2012

One hundred years ago, on April 20, 1912, The Boston Red Sox played their first official game in Fenway Park. In honor of that milestone, on April 19, the Red Sox welcome fans to an open house to celebrate Fenway Park’s centennial celebration. There will be historical artifacts, photographs, and banners on display throughout the park, following the "Fenway Park: A Living Museum" path. Visitors will also have a chance to meet Red Sox legends, and visit parts of the ballpark generally inaccessible to fans.


The Fenway Park Open House also includes:

  • An opportunity for fans to explore 100 year old Fenway Park at their own pace

  • Historical markers denote historic home runs, events, and spots within the park

  • A display of the clubhouse that shows fans the mud that's rubbed on the baseballs, pine tar, rosin bag and other items that fans generally don't see during a visit to the park

  • Old programs, tickets, chairs, blueprints and many other items of historic interest from Fenway Park's 100-year old history

  • Autograph signings throughout the day

  • An opportunity to walk the warning track, peek inside the Green Monster scoreboard and visit other spaces within the ballpark not normally available or accessible to fans

The next day, on April 20, the Red Sox will play the New York Yankees, the same team they played for the first official game in 1912, with both teams wearing historic uniforms.

For more information about the Fenway Park Open House, visit their website here.  We hope you enjoy the event!

April Festivities Around the World

Global Immersions - Friday, April 06, 2012

April is the month that marks the beginning of spring in the Northern hemisphere. The etymology of "April" in Latin is aperire, which means "to open": the "opening" of trees and flowers. Boston's magnolia trees have blossomed considerably early this year and has been called one of the earliest blossoming in 140 years of record keeping. 

Many of you may be aware that Easter and Passover are coming up! But what other holidays are going on in April? Let's take a look!

Easter (Resurrection Day)

Easter is a Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Christian's believe that Jesus Christ was resurrected from the death three days after his crucifixion, which is commemorated on Good Friday. It is celebrated on the first Sunday after the first full moon on or after March 21st. Traditionally, Saturday's are spent decorating Easter eggs and hunting for them with children on the following Sunday. Hot cross buns (spiced buns with a cross on top) are traditionally eaten on Good Friday and are a symbol for the Crucifixion. 


Passover

Passover is a Jewish holiday that is celebrated on the 15th day of the 7th month in the Jewish calender. This year, Passover begins Friday, April 6th and ends on Saturday, April 14th. Passover commemorates the story of Exodus, where ancient Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. The most important Passover tradition is the seder. During the seder the story of Exodus is retold, four cups of wine are to be had each representing an expression of deliverance, and partaking in eating symbolic foods on a seder plate. 


Golden Week

In Japan, Golden Week is a period consisting of four holidays. It begins on April 29th with Showa Day, which honors the birthday of the late Emperor Hirohito. May 3rd is Constitution Memorial Day, which commemorates the declaration of the 1947 Constitution of Japan. May 4th is celebrated with Greenery day and is set aside for nature appreciation. Commemorative plantings take place across the country. The final holiday is Children's Day, which lands on May 5th. The holiday respects and embraces children's personalities and to celebrate their happiness. On Children's Day, families hang koinobori's (carp streamers), which symbolize the determination and vigor of the carp overcoming obstacles to swim upstream. 


Earth Day

Earth Day is held every year worldwide on April 22nd. The United Nations even designated that day as International Mother Earth Day. This holiday is meant to increase awareness and appreciate our planet's natural environment. It was pioneered by John McConnell in 1969 and has since then gained an immense amount of support. Their are many traditions people around the world take part in to commemorate this holiday. There is planting a tree, picking up trash, recycling, and even hiking!


Do you know of any other holidays that occur in April? If so, please let us know!


Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Day

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Week_(Japan)

Words Without an English Equivalent

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, March 23, 2012

Though there are currently over 1,000,000 words in the English language, Mental Floss has noted that “despite this large lexicon, many nuances of human experience still leave us tongue-tied.”

Here are some foreign words with no direct English translation:

Iktsuarpok (Inuit)
You know that feeling of anticipation when you’re waiting for someone to show up at your house and you keep going outside to see if they’re there yet? This is the word for it.

Pana Po’o (Hawaiian) 
“Hmm, now where did I leave those keys?” he said, pana po’oing. It means to scratch your head in order to help you remember something you’ve forgotten.

Mencolek (Indonesian) 
You know that old trick where you tap someone lightly on the opposite shoulder from behind to fool them? The Indonesians have a word for it.

Kummerspeck (German)
Excess weight gained from emotional overeating. Literally, it means grief bacon.

Greng-jai (Thai)
That feeling you get when you don’t want someone to do something for you because it would be a pain for them.

Shemomedjamo (Georgian)
You know when you’re really full, but your meal is just so delicious, you can’t stop eating it? This word means, “I accidentally ate the whole thing.”

Zeg (Georgian)
It means “the day after tomorrow.”

Pålegg (Norweigian)
The Norwegians have a non-specific descriptor for anything – ham, cheese, jam, Nutella, mustard, herring, pickles, Doritos, you name it – you might consider putting into a sandwich.

Tartle (Scots)
The word for that panicky hesitation just before you have to introduce someone whose name you can’t quite remember.

Mamihlapinatapai (Yaghan language of Tierra del Fuego)
This word captures that special look shared between two people, when both are wishing that the other would do something that they both want, but neither want to do.

Sources:

Mental Floss

Reader's Digest Magazine

Explore Boston - South Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, March 16, 2012

As one of America’s oldest and most historic neighborhoods, South Boston is a waterfront community next to Fort Point Channel and Dorchester Bay.  Though it is traditionally known as an Irish Catholic neighborhood, as the City of Boston website notes, “in recent years South Boston has become increasingly desirable among young professionals and families who are attracted to the neighborhood's strong sense of community and quick access to downtown and public transportation”. 


South Boston's Dorchester Heights National Historic Site

Commonly referred to as “Southie,” South Boston is home to a variety of popular parks, beaches, and yearly events. Offering beautiful views, space for recreation and plenty of history, South Boston’s Castle Island features a Revolution-era fort, miles of shoreline and parklands, and a walkway along the beach. Many cultural and educational centers can also be found in South Boston, including the Institute for Contemporary Art, the Boston’s Children’s Museum, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Museum and Library, and the University of Massachusetts Boston. In addition, "Southie Pride" is on full display in March when city residents flock to the neighborhood to enjoy the annual South Boston St. Patrick's Day Parade. 

Have you recently been to South Boston? Let us know! If you’re Boston this weekend, be sure to head to South Boston on Sunday to see the Saint Patrick’s Day Parade! 

Sources: 

St. Patrick's Day

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, March 13, 2012

On March 17th every year, people throughout the world honor one of the most widely celebrated saints, Saint Patrick. Known as the patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick’s Day represents not only Christian values, but also a secular celebration of Irish culture. St. Patrick’s Day is usually accompanied by shamrocks, Irish flags, Irish food and drink, and a hefty dose of the color green. Though St. Patrick’s Day is an official holiday in only a few places, it is widely celebrated by the Irish diaspora - and others – worldwide.


Ireland

Though St. Patrick’s Day has been a celebrated feast day since the ninth century, it became an official public holiday in 1903. The holiday remains largely religious, and is often associated with religious observance, festivals, and parades.

Argentina

Boasting the fifth largest Irish community in the world outside Ireland, Argentina celebrates Saint Patrick’s Day with street parties all night long. With over 50,000 people taking part in the celebrations, Argentineans dance and drink all night in their green clothes.

Canada

Since 1824, Montreal holds one of the longest-running Saint Patrick’s Day parades in North America. Though Saint Patrick’s Day is a holiday in only the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, many other groups have lobbied to make it an official national holiday in Canada.

Japan

Holding Asia’s largest Saint Patrick’s Day parade, the Tokyo parade, organized by the Irish Network Japan, has been going on since 1992. Today, parades are held in many locations across Japan, and go on throughout the entire month of March.

The United States   

Though Saint Patrick’s Day is not an official holiday in the US, it has been celebrated since the late eighteenth century. The day is largely a celebration of Irish and Irish-American culture, and features many parades, religious events, feasts, and displays of the color green. In Boston,  Saint Patrick's Day remains a huge day of celebration due to the large Irish population. With over 500,000 visitors each year, the Boston parade is not only the oldest St. Patrick's Day parade in the US, but also one of the largest. For more information about Saint Patrick's Day events in Boston, look here

Do you have Saint Patrick’s Day plans? Let us know! 

Sources:

timeanddate.com

boston.com/stpatricksday/

Daylight Saving Time

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, March 09, 2012

On Sunday, March 11, 2012, clocks in the United States (and many others throughout the world) are advanced one hour so that evenings have more sunlight in the warmer months of the year. First established in 1918, “Daylight Saving Time” allows for people to take advantage of sunlight later in the day, as well as encourage energy savings. As days become shorter again in fall and winter months, clocks are returned to “standard” time so that there is more sunlight in the mornings.


Although Daylight Saving Time has been around for nearly 100 years in the United States, there is still a good deal of controversy surrounding the practice. Many critics feel that Daylight Savings is not beneficial, or simply too complicated. Worldwide, many countries use Daylight Savings in order to conserve daylight; the days of change, however, often differ from country to country (most of Europe changes on the last Sunday in March, while much of Oceania changes on the first Sunday in April). Other countries, such as large portions of Africa and Asia have opted to stop using Daylight Savings Time, or have simply never used it at all.

In the US, Daylight Savings occurs on the second Sunday of March, and ends on first Sunday of November. Daylight Savings is easily remembered with the mnemonic device, “spring forward, fall back” to help people remember which direction to shift the clocks for each time period.

Sources:

The Patch

Washington Post

Valentine’s Day Around the Globe

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Though some Americans consider Valentine’s Day to be a superficial holiday, there is long history behind the holiday of love. First established in 496 AD by Pope Gelasius I, Valentine’s Day was originally created to honor the early Christian Saint Valentine. Today, Valentine’s Day is a day for people to express their love for each other by presenting flowers, candy, or cards. Scroll down to find out more about how different cultures express their love throughout the world!




Guatemala 

Known as El Día del Cariño, Valentine’s Day in Guatemala is a colorful, affectionate affair. Throughout Latin America, the day is as much about friendship and family as it is about love;   commonly referred to as the day of amor y amistad — love and friendship — Guatemalans exchange flowers, chocolates and cards like in the U.S., but with pals as well as with admirers. And in Guatemala City, the holiday isn’t just for youth.  In the country’s capital, it’s common for locals and tourists to dress up in feathered masks or vivid Mayan attire and partake in Old Love, a senior citizens’ parade. 

China 

China not only has its own New Year, but also celebrates its own Valentine’s Day. Generated from an age-old love story involving a queen’s daughter and a cowboy, the Qixi Festival, Chinese Valentine’s Day, falls on the seventh day of the seventh lunar month, usually in early August. On the Chinese Valentine’s Day, men who want to impress their partners typically book luxury dinners and shower them with roses, while Chinese girls will offer fruit to deities in hopes for a good match. 

Wales

In Wales, the equivalent of St. Valentine is Saint Dwynwen, the patron saint of lovers. It is said that the beautiful saint fell in love with handsome young man, and later begged God to bring him back to life in exchange for a life of service. Now a place of pilgrimage, visitors make the trek to a well where apparently sacred eels can forecast the outcome of relationships. Celebrated January 25, the holiday often involves love spoons as an old tradition of courting and marriage.  A Welsh man would carve a love spoon for his beloved one, and decorate the whittled wood with different symbols: Keys would signify a man’s heart, wheels his hard work and beads, his preferred number of offspring. 

Japan 

In Japan, Valentine’s Day works a little differently; there are not one but two days of romance. On February 14, women typically give chocolate to their boyfriends, male friends and superiors. A month later, men return the favor; on March 14, known as White Day, men give their girlfriends or wives clothes, jewelry and of course, more chocolate. 

Will you be celebrating Valentine’s Day this year? Let us know how!

Source: