English Chinese Spanish Japanese Korean Turkish

News and Announcements

Welcome to Boston Hoemstay - JAAC Josai High School22-Oct-2017

A group of Japanese students is visiting this week to tour Boston and sight see! They will be st..

Welcome to Boston Homestay - American Councils Fellows13-Oct-2017

A group of Fellows with American Councils (https://www.americancouncils.org/programs/professiona..


Best in Hospitality

New England Fall Foliage

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 27, 2017

It is officially Fall, and we are all set and ready for a season of pumpkin spice, apple cider, crisp weather, and colorful trees! In my humble opinion as a born-and-raised-Bostonian, the Northeast is the best place in the U.S. to catch the Fall foliage. Whether or not you want to hike the White Mountains or hop on a foliage train tour, you will certainly find some incredibly beautiful views in and around the region this season. Here's a breakdown of the best ways to view the Fall foliage:

If you want to see colorful trees without the hassle of traveling far, you can enjoy wonderful views by touring around Boston on your own! The Boston Common/Public Garden and the Esplanade all put on a spectacular display of colors during the Fall. The Common and the Garden, located next to each other, tend to change color a bit earlier than the Esplanade. Take a stroll across the foot bridge in the Public Garden to see Mallard Island (of Make Way for Ducklings) or search for the brass labels underneath trees in the Common to discover what leafy species you can admire. In October, the Esplanade, the long linear park along the Charles River, will be aflame with reds, oranges, and yellows. Take a jog along the river or grab a buddy and a lunch and enjoy the colors in a piece of peaceful park!

If you want an easy escape from the bustling city, hop on the Orange MBTA Line to Forest Hills and walk through the Arnold Arboretum. The 265-acre Arboretum hosts almost 5,000 different species of trees that turn into a fiery composition in October. Boston's Fall Foliage Festival will be hosted in Arnold Arboretum on the last Sunday of October, so be sure to come out and enjoy apples, cider, storytelling, and the brilliant colors of the Arboretum.

Another option for foliage sight-seeing is taking a walk, jog, or bike down the Southwest Corridor through Jamaica Plain to Back Bay and Beacon Hill. These elegant neighborhoods boast a variety of colorful leaves and textures. The picturesque neighborhoods will not disappoint with lovely little eateries, shops, and brilliant leafy colors.

If you want a more extensive Fall foliage experience, there are tours to different New England areas that will NOT disappoint. The Fall Foliage Sightseeing Tour from Boston includes a lunch, a visit to an apple orchard, and views of old Colonial churches, farms, and villages. This is a great option to immerse yourself in the New England seasonal colors and tranquil landscapes. Another option is the Autumn on Old Cape Cod Tour. This coach tour stops at the Sandwich Glass museum and the JFK memorial in Hyannis Port before turning into a sightseeing cruise along Lewis Bay, where you will see entrancing views of quaint Cape Cod villages. Lastly, the New England Coastal Tour will take you from Boston to Maine along the beautiful New England coast. You will see the wonderful fall foliage along the Massachusetts and New Hampshire coasts, and get a chance to lunch and shop in Kennebunkport, Maine.

There are many ways to admire the colorful foliage in and around Boston, so be sure to check out as much of the region as you can this Fall!

The Science of Hygge

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Imagine a cold winter's night and you're curled up on the couch under a mound of blankets watching your favorite show or reading a thrilling book with a cup of tea steaming next to you. If you have children, they are finally asleep -  and you have this particular moment all to yourself. It's nice, is it not? In the U.S., we might call the fuzzy, warm feeling created in that moment a sense of "coziness". In the Danish culture, however, there is a specific word to describe that feeling: hygge.

Pronounced "hoo-guh", hygge is defined by Oxford Dictionary as "a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being". Some refer to it as an "art of creating intimacy" - either with yourself, with others, or with your home. Hygge generally requires a person to create a warm, welcoming atmosphere that can be shared with friends, family, and even strangers.

Hygge has become one of the defining aspects of Danish culture. In the last few years, the philosophy has gained an international audience; at least six books on hygge were published in the U.S. in 2016 alone. The concept is more than just a room full of candles and familiar faces though - it is a way of life that has helped Danes appreciate the importance of simplicity and practice a slower pace of life.

CEOs of companies, such as Meik Wiking of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen, have written books on hygge and how others around the world can start to incorporate it in their lives. Here is a list that Wiking includes in his  "The Little Book of Hygge":

  • Get comfy. Take a break.
  • Be here now. Turn off the phones.
  • Turn down the lights. Bring out the candles.
  • Build relationships. Spend time with your tribe.
  • Give yourself a break from the demands of healthy living. Cake is most definitely hygge.
  • Live life today, like there is no coffee tomorrow.

Though there is not a direct translation of the word hygge in English, the tangible feeling of comfort, coziness, and contentedness is one we are all familiar with. Remember to pause what you are doing today, take a deep breath, and slow down.

A Favorite Fall Activity: Apple Picking!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 06, 2017

As the beginning of September brought some chilly weather and the start of a new school year, we are reminded that autumn is right around the corner. Fall is one of the most beautiful times to be in the Northeast of the United States, and the tell-tale scenic changing colors reminds us, once more, that apple picking season is upon us.

Fresh hot cider, juicy apples, and delicious freshly baked cider doughnuts are some of the best things New England orchards have to offer. Beyond that, the fun activity is known for its bonding and relaxing nature! Here is a list of apple orchards within an hour's drive from Boston:

Belkin Family Lookout Farm

One of the longest running farms in the country, the Belkin Family Lookout Farm boats apples, pumpkins, Asian pears, train rides, and farm animal fun! The closest working farm to the city, this gem will surely brighten up your fall.

Price: $12 weekday admission per person (kids under 2 are FREE); $16 weekend admission

10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, 89 Pleasant St., South Natick, Massachusetts, 508-653-0653

Brooksby Farm

Located a little further outside of Boston, Brooksby Farm has all of the Fall holiday essentials. This Pick-Your-Own apple orchard also has doughnuts, cider, pumpkin patches, and more!

Price: $9 for 1/2-peck bag; $17 for 1-peck bag


9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily, 54 Felton St., Peabody, Massachusetts, 978-531-7456

Dowse Orchards

For over 200 years, Dowse Orchards has been a functioning farm that produces apples, veggies, flowers, pumpkins, and Christmas trees.  This Fall come out to pick your favorite sweet Golden and Red apples for the best pies around!

Price: $16 for 1/2-peck bag


9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturdays & Sundays, 98 North Main St., Sherborn, Massachusetts, 508-653-2639, dowseorchards.com.

Honey Pot Hill

Nominated for Best Apple Orchard of 2017 by USA Today, Honey Pot Hill Orchards is a must-see this Fall! From hedge mazes, to hay rides, to farm animals, to hot cider and cider doughnuts, to jams, veggies, and pies, and, of course, to pick-your-own apples (and blueberries!), Honey Pot Hill has so much to offer for the best Fall day! Be sure to come out and enjoy the festivities this year.

Price: $18 for 10lb bag; $28 for 20lb bag


9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. daily, 138 Sudbury Road, Stow,  Massachusetts, 978-562-5666

For a more comprehensive list of apple-picking Orchards in and around Boston, follow this link!