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Welcome to Boston Hoemstay - JAAC Josai High School22-Oct-2017

A group of Japanese students is visiting this week to tour Boston and sight see! They will be st..

Welcome to Boston Homestay - American Councils Fellows13-Oct-2017

A group of Fellows with American Councils (https://www.americancouncils.org/programs/professiona..


Best in Hospitality

Explore Boston: Juices around the city

Global Immersions Recruiting - Sunday, May 28, 2017


Recently, the trend of juicing has become increasingly popular due to its health benefits. Many juice stores have opened up around Boston, many with specialty juices and snack-like food items. While they don't come cheap, these are definitely worth checking out to get your healthy juice fix.

Jugos


One of the most popular and one of my person favorites is Jugos, a hole in the wall juice store located right in Back Bay station. Although the menu is in Spanish and if you're like me, have a hard time getting through it, you'll find that they serve a wide variety of juices, smoothes, acai bowls, and nut milk based beverages. On top of this, they serve sandwiches and toasts with toppings, such as the ever popular avocado toast.

Pressed


Pressed is more than just a juice store but also a cafe of sorts. Not only does pressed offer a wide variety of juices and smoothes and your typical acai bowls, they also have an extensive menu of toasts and greens.  Their avocado toast is one of my favorites, however their salads are also worth trying as well. It is located near the Charles/MGH station in Beacon Hill of Boston.

The Juice Union


Located in Somerville, the juice union prides itself on only using fresh fruits, vegetables, and plant milks, omitting any artificial sweeteners and dairy. They also offer a variety of tasty smoothies, smoothie bowls, and coffee!

Revolution Juice


Revolution Juice is located right near the Prudential Center in Back Bay. Like others, they offer vegetable and fruit juices, as well as juice cleanse options. They also offer unique meal bowls complete with items like oatmeal, sweet potatoes, and various other fruits and vegetables.

The Juicery


This store offers several locations throughout Massachusetts and New Hampshire, however the closest one to Boston is located downtown right off of the Haymarket T stop. Along with their fruit and vegetable juices offers acai bowls, energy shots, and various other health supplements such as protein powder, flaxseed, and many more.


No matter where you are in Boston, a juice store is likely a short walk away! The juicing trend has been ever-growing recently and these delicious smoothies and juices are definitely a healthy treat that are worth a try! There are countless other stores in Boston as well, and you can find them all ranked here!

Memorial Day Weekend in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Memorial Day is an annual holiday celebrated throughout the United States in remembrance of those who have died in service in the United States military. The holiday originated from honoring the dead from the Civil War, however later on was expanded to encompass all fallen soldiers. It was first recognized by New York in 1873, and eventually spread throughout the country. Now it is a federal holiday observed on the last Monday each May, allowing for an annual three day weekend that everyone looks forward to.

This Monday, May 26th, many Americans will visit cemeteries and memorials to honor those who have died in the American Armed Forces. Memorial Day, formerly known as Decoration Day, is also a day when families and individuals decorate graves and cemeteries with American flags.

For many Americans, Memorial Day also marks the beginning of the summer season. Many celebrate the holiday by taking short vacations, having barbeques, picnics, and family gatherings. Also, many pools and other outdoor spaces will open up this weekend.

Some activities occurring around Boston this Memorial Day weekend include:

View the Military Heroes Garden of Flags at the Boston Common

Every year flags are planted in front of the Soldiers and Sailors monument located at the Boston Common to commemorate those who gave their lives serving our country. For more information visit: http://www.massmilitaryheroes.org/our-work/community-building-events/public-program-events/memorial-day-flag-garden-planting/

Free Museum Admission

Museum of Fine Arts: The MFA is offering free admission to all visitors on Monday, May 29th from 10am to 4:45pm!

Institute of Contemporary Art: The ICA is also offering free admission from 10am to 5pm on Memorial Day, Monday May 29th.

Shop Memorial Day Sales


Memorial Day weekend is the perfect time to go shopping, as many places put on special sales or promotions in honor of the weekend. Check out the Prudential Center and Copley Square for upscale stores and boutiques, or the Wretham Outlets and Assembly Row for even bigger savings!

In addition to these, you can always go sightseeing around Boston or go on a walking tour to enjoy the first unofficial weekend of summer.

Its Finally Summer: How to Get Out and Enjoy Boston

Global Immersions - Saturday, May 20, 2017


Now that the weather in Boston is finally warm, it's time to take advantage of the activities around Boston! Every year as the temperature warms up, people come out and crowd the streets to enjoy the city. Restaurants open up their outdoor seating, farmers markets start up, and events around the city begin to take place. Summer is the perfect time to enjoy the city and get out, and while the opportunities may seem overwhelming, here are some ideas of what you can do to enjoy the city throughout the summer!

Bike around Boston with Hubway


There is no better way to see the city than going for a walk, run, or riding a bike. You can ride a bike along the pathways next to the Charles, or anywhere throughout the city! Hubway allows riders to obtain a 24 hour pass for just $8! There are over 180 stations across Boston,  Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. All you have to do is just pick up a bike and return it to any station throughout the city once you are done!

Soak up some sun at Revere Beach


Revere beach is easily accessible on the T by taking the Blue Line out to Wonderland Station. As America's first public beach established in 1896, it is located right outside of Downtown Boston. Throughout the summer, there are several exciting events hosted here such as the Revere Beach Kite Festival and the Sand Sculpting Festival. Apart from the happenings, it is a nice place to enjoy some sun and catch some waves.

Enjoy a Lobster Roll and the Beaches at Castle Island


Castle Island is located in South Boston and can be identified by its beautiful 19th century granite fort located on the premises. Within the Island, one can relax on the green lawns, or enjoy one of the two beaches. The M Street beach and Carson Beach occupy a three miles stretch along the island and overlook Pleasure Bay. While you're there, don't forget to enjoy a lobster roll or burger from Sullivan's! The food is delicious and definitely worth trying.

Go to the Boston Harbor Islands


There are several Boston Harbor Islands that can be accessed through the Boston Harbor Cruises. These islands are a great escape from the city, especially on a beautiful summer day. There are four islands accessible by the ferry; George's Island, Spectacle Island, Peddocks Island, and Lovells Island. For $17 ($10 for children aged 3-11) you can explore these National State Parks which often have events scheduled throughout the summer. Taking the time to explore these islands is definitely worth your while, and will prove to be a pleasant change of scenery!

Go to a Red Sox Game or Tour Fenway Park!


 Summer is the perfect time to enjoy a nice Red Sox game outside! Sit in the bleacher seats (usually around ~$30) and soak up some sun while enjoying the game. If sitting in the sun and watching baseball isn't for you, then take a tour of  Fenway Park instead! The Fenway Park tours are $20 and occur everyday throughout the day beginning at 9am.

Explore the Arnold Arboretum


The Arnold Arboretum, located in Jamaica Plain near Forest Hills, is home to many species of trees and other flora. Spring and summer are the perfect times to visit the Arboretum as plants are in full bloom and it is a great time of the year to sit outside and soak up the nature. The arboretum is also home to several nature-oriented events that are worth checking out!

The Lawn on D


The Lawn on D is an installment on D street in South Boston. The attraction offers food and beverages, as well as various lawn games to its visitors. If you want to sit and hangout, there is also live music at night! Only open during the summer, it is definitely a great way to spend your afternoon or evening as it is open all day every day of the week. Also be sure to check out their special events, which occur fairly regularly throughout the summer.

Go shopping, enjoy a meal, and people watch on Newbury Street


Newbury Street is one of Boston's most scenic streets, filled with shops and many restaurants. If you're not into shopping, in the warmer months many of these restaurants open up their outdoor seating which makes for a great people watching experience.  Although there are countless options to choose from, some great eats with outdoor seating include Cafeteria, Tapeo, Sonsie, Stepahnie's, and Parish Cafe, to name a few.

Free Fun Fridays with the Highland Street Foundation


The Highland Street Foundation sponsors Free Fun Fridays throughout the summer in celebration of its 20th anniversary. This is within the greater Boston area as well as outside the city, and includes a free public attraction each Friday beginning June 23rd through August 25th. Check out the schedule and enjoy free admission to some of your favorite attractions around Boston. 

Enjoy a local farmers market


There are several farmers markets throughout Boston that run through the spring and summer. These are a great way to get some cheap produce as well as to check out some specialty food items from local vendors!

Union Square Farmers Market

Located in Somerville, the Union Square Farmers Market is open on Saturdays from 9:00AM – 1:00PM, and runs through November 18, 2017.

Dewey Square Farmers Market

The Boston Public Market runs the Dewey Square Farmers Market, located in the plaza right across from South Station.  It is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:30am to 6:30pm, and runs through November 21st.

Haymarket Farmers Market

The Haymarket Farmers is located right off of the Haymarket T stop on the Orange Line, right near Faneuil Hall in Downtown Boston. The market runs from dawn until dusk, with no official hours. Generally vendors are outside all day, weather permitting.  This market is only open on Fridays and Saturdays.

Copley Square Farmers Market

The Copley Square Farmers Market runs from 11am to 6pm on Tuesday and Friday through November 21st. It is located right off of the Green Line at the Copley T stop.

 Kayak in the Charles:


Charles River Kayak has five locations across the city, allowing you to start from wherever is closest to you. These include Allston, Kendall Square, Nahanton Park in Newton, the Moody Street Dam in Waltham, and Somerville. Starting at just $15 per hour, kayaking in the Charles allows you to escape some of the summer heat while enjoying a beautiful view of the city. Paddleboards and canoes are also available for rental.

Next time you need something to do this summer, check out any of the above options! There are also countless other special events occurring throughout the city in the coming months. For more information of special events, feel free to check out our Facebook page for daily updates and the latest happenings!

Riding Around Boston: Local Ride Sharing Services

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Ride Sharing apps have become increasingly popular making it easier than ever to get from Point A to point B. Many ride sharing apps operate in the Boston area and are a convenient way for international visitors or anyone new to the city to get around especially if they are unfamiliar with Boston or the public transportation system. These services are extremely convenient, and many different options have emerged allowing visitors to choose from a varying number of apps. Here are some of your ride-sharing options that operate in the greater Boston area:


Uber was the first ride-sharing apps to be created and is probably the most well known and widely used service. Uber is available around the world and riders can expect short wait times and quick pick-ups due to the large number of Uber drivers throughout Boston. Uber prices do fluctuate depending on demand at any given time of the day, therefore it is important to keep in mind rush hour and other times that there is an increased demand. Recently, Uber has also created an "uberPOOL" option, in which riders have the opportunity to take advantage of a cheaper fare in exchange for sharing your ride with other riders. While these rides generally take a longer time, if you are not in a rush to get to your destination the cheaper fares may be worth the wait.

Lyft is the second largest ride-sharing app and Uber's main competitor. Lyft and Uber are rather similar, as Lyft offers a "Lyft Line" option that allows you to get a cheaper fare in exchange for sharing your ride with other passengers. Lyft's prices also fluctuate based on demand and will surge prices in high-demand times. However unlike Uber, Lyft allows riders to tip their drivers. 


Fasten is a small startup operating gaining momentum in Boston. Fasten works in the same fashion as Uber and Lyft however it advertises better prices for both drivers and riders. Instead of the app taking a percentage cut, say 20% to 30%, from each ride, it only takes $1 per ride, so drivers can keep a larger percentage of the profits. For passengers, Fasten can potentially be cheaper because it doesn't use "surge pricing," price hikes that kick in when demand goes up. Instead, Fasten says it lets passengers increase their fare offers if drivers don't accept their ride requests quickly enough.


Safr is a new ride-sharing service focused on the safety and empowerment of women. With unique features designed for and by women, Safr aims to improve the lives of women everywhere through safe transportation, job creation, and financial security. Safr drivers are all female and are thoroughly vetted and undergo comprehensive background checks in criminal and motor vehicle history to ensure maximum safety for riders.


Arro is an application that lets you easily call taxis rather than drivers. You can use the app to call a cab, and you are automatically charged through the app as you would be in an Uber or Lyft. You can even use Arro to pay for a taxi that your'e already in, even if you hailed the cab on your own, without going through the app. This helps to support taxi companies throughout Boston that have seen a decline in business since the emergence of Uber and other ride-sharing apps.


Validated is not really a ride sharing app, though it works alongside one. With Validated, you can earn points toward rides on popular apps like Uber or by shopping at any of the "Validated" businesses. Currently in Boston these include restaurants and retail stores. Hundreds of brands can be used with the app so you can earn free rides purchasing items you typically buy merely by scanning your receipt into the app!


Price Comparison Resources: 


Several applications make is easy to compare prices across ride-sharing apps and taxis to make sure you're getting the cheapest fare. The websites Ride Guru and WhatstheFare show the average prices across multiple apps for your designated trip. In addition to these, the app FairRide compares Lyft and Uber prices next to each other, so you can choose the cheapest option for your ride from the convenience of your phone.  These resources are particularly helpful in ensuring that you get the cheapest fare possible! 

There are endless options for transportation around Boston. Ride-sharing apps have skyrocketed in popularity recently, making more and more options available for your use. Next time you need to go somewhere in a hurry, check out any of the above apps, and be sure to use the price comparison apps as well to get a great deal!


Dining Etiquette Around the World

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Many of us likely feel as though we have a strong command on dining etiquette in our respective countries. However, some people may not know that these table manners vary across the world from region to region, and sometimes even within those regions. Some things that we may not even think twice about doing may be considered extremely rude or taboo in other countries. If you are hosting an international visitor or traveling abroad, it is important to keep these in mind!

Asia:

Do not use your chopsticks as a spear: Throughout Asia, it is consistently considered rude to spear your food with chopsticks instead of using them properly to pick up the food. This has to do with superstitious beliefs as usually when on pierces their food with chopsticks you are offering this food to the dead.


Other chopstick rules: There are actually many rules surrounding the use of chopsticks. For example, pointing a chopstick at someone is just as rude if not more disrespectful than pointing a finger. In addition to this, passing food directly from your chopsticks to another's is actually part of a funeral ritual in which the deceased's bones are passed between chopsticks. Also in many parts of Asia placing your chopsticks sticking straight up in your food is a gesture meant for the deceased. It is best to avoid these practices as many Asian cultures as superstitious and doing these is considered very taboo and disrespectful.

Eat the food served to you: Particularly in China and Korea, it is an honor to be served food especially what are perceived as the "best" parts of something. Even if you do not like the food, it is respectful to finish the food served to you.

Paying the bill: In China and other areas influenced by Chinese customs such as Malaysia, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, bills are not typically split among diners. Instead, one person picks up the entire check. Usually a several people will put up a fight to cover the expenses, and doing so shows a sign of appreciation for relationships and is seen as polite.

Europe:

Bread: In France, bread is placed directly on the table as opposed to being placed on a bread plate. Bread is not served as an appetizer and should be consumed along with your meal. When consuming the bread, it is important to break it into pieces as opposed to biting them off.

Also, in Russia it is considered bad form to waste bread, as it is believed that when one dies all of the bread they've wasted over the years will be weighed and added to the balance that determines whether or not one is accepted into heaven.

Eating your food as it is prepared: In Portugal and Spain, it is considered an insult to the cook to alter your food by adding salt and pepper to the prepared dish.

Use your silverware: Often times in European countries, it is considered polite and normal use your utensils with what some may consider finger foods, such as pizza.

Middle East:

Don't eat with your left hand: Because the left hand is associated with using the restroom and associated bodily functions, it is considered unsanitary and rude to use your left hand to eat. Instead, eat strictly with your right hand.

Drinking coffee: In Bedouin culture, they will continue to pour you coffee once you have finished it. That is, until you shake the cup by tilting it two to three times when you hand it back. By doing this, you are signifying that you are finished.

Etiquette for eating with your hands: While it differs from country to country, generally when eating with your hands you should use your fingertips to ensure the food does not touch your palms. If you are sharing a large dish, which is common, only eat from your side of the plate. Often times diners will use bread to scoop the food, which the house owner breaks and distributes to guests.

It is important to remember that every country is different and these rules of etiquette may vary! To be safe, look up specific customs for a specific country if you are curious, however these are some general rules to follow for each region.

Experiencing US Culture With Our Japanese Students

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, May 02, 2017

This Spring we had several different groups of Japanese students visit Boston and experience American culture through homestay. As part of their homestay experience, our hosts engaged in activities with the students to introduce them to life in New England. Many hosts went above and beyond, taking their students on trips to exciting places like Maine, New Hampshire, Martha's Vineyard or Cape Cod! Others bonded with their students during fun visits to various locations in the greater Boston area.  From our host feedback surveys we were able to read all about the great things our hosts and students did together. If you're wondering what you should do with your students, here are some highlights from the hosts of our Japanese groups - as you'll notice many of these activities are free!



  • Visited Rockport; explored an art gallery and tried clam chowder
  • Visited a local high school and football stadium
  • Went on a driving tour of Boston
  • Went salsa dancing
  • Went to a rock climbing place
  • Created oragami together
  • Attended a dance class
  • Hiked the cliffs at East Point in Nahant
  • Visited Salem and Gloucester
  • Celebrated Valentine's Day with a special meal and flowers for the students
  • Enjoyed cannolis at Eataly  
  • Visited Long Sand Beach in Maine
  • Played games at our local Church
  • Visited a farm in the White Mountains of New Hampshire
  • Toured Fenway Park



  • Visited the Mapparium at the Christian Science Monitor Building
  • Saw the Cy Young statue at the Northeastern University campus
  • Went to the Skyzone
  • Visited Martha's Vineyard
  • Visited Cape Cod
  • Went to a Celtic's game
  • Attended Winchester High Schools performance of Shrek the Musical
  • Visited a local beach
  • Saw the seals outside the Aquarium
  • Went to the St. Patrick's Day Parade in South Boston
  • Visited City Hall and the State House



  • Went to the Hyde Park firehouse
  • Explored Woonsocket Rhode Island; went to the train depot to see the statue of Hachiko (dog) and the plaque given by the people of Japan
  • Went to the movies together 
  • Visited Granite Links golf course to see the city
  • Toured Tufts University, Northeastern University, and Berklee College of Music
These are just some of the memorable moments our hosts and students shared together. Overall, the feedback we received from both the hosts and students of our Japanese programs was extremely positive! The students enjoyed spending time with their host families and our host parents liked getting to know their students!