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Office Closed -- Happy Holidays!15-Dec-2017

Happy Holidays from Global Immersions Homestay! We wish you and your family a safe and healthy h..

Welcome to Boston - Japanese Christmas High School Group!11-Dec-2017

A large group of high school visitors from Niijima Gakuen High School (https://niijima-gakuen.jp..


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Explore Boston: Somerville!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 25, 2017

As one of the most historic cities in the country, Boston has a lot to offer for both short-term visitors and the locals. The city in itself feels more like a giant town than a bustling metropolis like New York, which lends to much of the city's picturesque appeal. That same charm is mirrored in neighboring cities such as Cambridge and, more recently, Somerville.

Somerville was founded in the mid-19th century, and has flourished in the last 175 years gaining fame for being one of the 'best-run' cities in Massachusetts. The little city that sits between Cambridge and Medford has become one of the hottest places to live as of late - especially for young professionals. This is mainly due to the MBTA Red Line that runs through Cambridge and into Somerville, creating an ease of access to all that the city has to offer.

And there's a lot for Somerville to boast about! From quaint, fun little town centers, to big shopping experiences, to old factory and museum tours, the list runs long for 'Things To Do' in this city. Over the last few decades, Davis and Union Square has spearheaded the revitalization of retail, dining, and nightlife in Somerville. You can find comedy clubs, exquisite eateries and cute boutiques all within four-block spans.

If you are looking for a typical day of shopping, exercise, and/or dining, then Assembly Row is your go-to spot. From premium retail outlet stores, to restaurants galore, to a 12-screen movie theater, and even residential and office spaces, the Assembly Row development has literally everything your heart may desire - besides, perhaps, true love.

If you need more proof that Somerville is one cool city, then here it is: Somerville is the home of marshmallow Fluff. Yes, you read that correctly. Fluff was invented in Somerville, and there's even a festival to commemorate it. If the history of Fluff doesn't get you moving to check out Somerville, then one of the other 80 sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places might!

All in all, Somerville is home to some of the greatest restaurants, shops, museums, art studios, and more! It's no wonder Lonely Planet named it one of the top 10 US travel destinations in 2017. Get out there!

Halloween Happenings!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Halloween is one of the best celebrated holidays in the Boston area due, naturally, to the amount of ghosts that roam our streets. From witch trials, to hangings, to some of the oldest graveyards in the country, Boston's history ensures that old lonely spirits are due to walk the streets on October 31st.

Just kidding. Maybe.

If you're a lover of all things spooky, get ready for some good Halloween fun in and around the Boston area!

Hop on the Boston Ghosts and Gravestones Tour for a jaunt around town in an old trolley with a host that looks remarkably like a 17th century gravedigger... This tour takes you through the most historic parts of Boston, where you will make stops at two of the oldest graveyards in the country, and learn about some of the most gruesome murders in Boston's history.

Remember that the tour is half walking, so grab some comfortable shoes!

Price: $39.00

If you really want a fright, check out the Factory of Terror in Fall River, MA. With three locations - Bloodworth Dungeon, 4-D Blackout, and Phobia Mayhem - this will sure be one horrifying night. You'll come face to face with moaning spirits, tormented corpses, and gothic nightmares in this haunted Factory.

Price: $15

Want to learn more about Boston's spooky history? Take a walking tour with Boston By Foot for their Beacon Hill with a BOO! event. On October 31 at 6pm, the tour will set out to walk amongst the dark alleys of Beacon Hill, where you will learn of the Hill's dark and murderous legacy.

Price: $20

Lastly, and certainly not least, take a day trip out to Salem, MA - better known as the "Witch City" -  to check out all of the Halloween happenings! You can take a scheduled 7 hour tour from Boston via the Salem Witch City Day Trip, which will take you up to Marblehead, then to the House of the Seven Gables, and then into downtown Salem for a bus and walking tour of the historic city. The Salem Witch Museum ramp up their decorations and activities this month as well, so be sure to take a visit to the country's oldest witch museum! The Haunted Witch Village and the Salem Wax Museum put on a great display over the weekends gearing up to Halloween. A trip to the Wax Museum might also lead you to Frankenstein's Laboratory!

If you're looking for all things Halloween in Salem, follow this link to check out the extensive list of events, tours, and activities in the Witch City all month long!

Here is a list of Halloween happenings in the Boston area too!

Día de los Muertos

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is an ancient Mexican holiday whose celebration has now spread across Latin America and to parts of the United States. It is also one of the most misunderstood holidays to date. Since it takes place near Halloween, many people assume that Day of the Dead is a Mexican/Latin version of Halloween.


Dia de los Muertos was originally celebrated by the Aztecs at the end of August to signify the end of their harvest season. When the Spanish conquistadors brought Catholicism to Latin America, una mezcla (a combination) happened. With the Catholic tradition, came All Saints' and All Souls' Day in early November. Over time, Dia de los Muertos coincided with these Catholic holidays and is now celebrated on a similar two-day structure on November 1 and 2.

It is thought that at midnight on October 31, the gates to heaven open to allow the spirits of the dead to reunite with their loved ones for 24 hours. On the first day of Dia de los Muertos, November 1, families remember children who have passed away. On the second day, November 2, loved ones remember adults who have died. The central belief on Day of the Dead is not to mourn those who have passed, but to celebrate their lives. Families leave little toys and candy shaped as skulls for the children, and food, favorite possessions, and alcohol for the adults. Celebrations usually include live music and dancing from homes to graveyards, where families will gather around the graves of those who have passed.

Day of the Dead is an incredibly important holiday for Mexican and Latin people, as many believe that happy spirits will provide protection and good luck to their families. Sometimes people spend up to two months building ofrendas (homemade altars to leave offerings on) for their loved ones. This tradition keeps families and villages close - both with each other and with their deceased relatives.

The History of Halloween

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 04, 2017

Straddling the line between fall and winter, the month of October boasts beautiful scenic views, an abundance of seasonal activities, and, most importantly, Halloween. Halloween is the holiday in which consumers purchase a quarter of all the candy sold in the U.S. annually. It is a time when neighborhoods come together for trick-or-treating, costume parties, and story-telling. But where did we come up with the idea to ask our neighbors for candy, and why do we dress up in scary outfits? To understand much of what the modern Halloween celebration entails, we must also understand where it has its roots.

Halloween is thought to have originated from an ancient Celtic festival called Samhain ("sow-in"). November 1st marked the start of a new year for the Celts - the end of summer and harvest, and the beginning of a dark, cold winter. It was thought that on the night before the new year, October 31st, the boundary between the dead and the living blurred, and souls were able to wander the earth. Druids, ancient Celtic priests, would light massive bonfires, where people gathered to offer crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities for a safe and protected winter.

The Roman Empire conquered Celtic territory around 43 AD, and for several hundred years dominated those lands. Over the course of their rule, two Roman celebrations were combined with Samhain: Feralia, a day to commemorate the dead, and a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit - typically symbolized through an apple. This was incorporated into Samhain through the tradition of bobbing for apples - an activity still practiced today. By 1000 AD, the Church had dedicated November 1st as All Saints' Day to honor the dead, which was celebrated in much of the same way as Samhain - big bonfires, parades, and dressing up. The night before this grand celebration was called "All-Hallows Eve", and, eventually, "Halloween".

During Samhain and All Saints' Day, people would dress in costume and ask fellow townspeople for food. When the holiday came to America during Colonial times, a particularly American version began to emerge. It began as a public event that celebrated the harvest, where villagers would share ghost stories, tell each other's fortunes, and get into all sorts of mischief-making. By the late 1800's, Halloween became more about the community than about ghosts and pranks, as parents were encouraged to remove the "fright" out of Halloween celebrations. It was not until the mid-1900's that the holiday again took a spooky turn. It was also around this time that Halloween became geared to younger crowds.

Today, Halloween is celebrated by all age and sizes, and with spooky stories, scary costumes, and yummy treats to boot.