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Boston Homestay Welcomes American Councils Visitors!18-Oct-2016

This week Global Immersions welcomed a group of working professionals from American Councils for..

Boston Homestay Welcomes Danish Students! 18-Oct-2016

On Sunday Global Immersions welcomed our sixth group of Danish students this fall! These student..

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Halloween Around The World

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Do you know where Halloween originated? If you guessed the United States.. you're wrong! Halloween actually began in Ireland  about 2,000 years ago as the Spirits of Meath Halloween Festival, an ancient Celtic Festival held in County Meath. The birthplace of Halloween, naturally, is home to one the biggest celebrations of the holiday.  Throughout Ireland, Halloween is celebrated with bonfires, party games, traditional food  such as barmbrack - an Irish fruit cake that contains coins, button, rings, and other (non-edible) fortunetelling items- and, of course, beer (among other drinks of choice). Why bake buttons and rings into a cake? Fortunetelling is part of the old Irish Halloween tradition and if a young woman gets a ring that has been baked in a pastry, bread, or even mashed potatoes, then she'll be married by next Halloween. Tricks are also an important part of the Irish Halloween tradition  - kids knock on doors, then run away before the doors get opened by the owner  (usually after they've already gotten candy from other houses). Thus is the origins of Trick-or-Treating.

Curious about Halloween celebrations in other cultures? Take a look at some other countries that will be decked out in costume this October 31st. 

Mexico doesn't actually celebrate Halloween, but their Dia de los Muertos celebration begins on October 31st and continues through November 2nd.  During this festival, Mexicans remember the deceased, tell their stories and celebrate their lives. Celebrations include family feasts, skull-shaped sweets, tequila, dancing, mariachi music, and parades of people dressed as skeletons to honor past ancestors. 

Halloween in Japan has become more popular over time, although still remains different from Halloween in the United States. Due to the well established popularity of Cosplay (costume play: dressing up as anime/manga characters) in Japan, the costume and commercialism aspect of celebrating Halloween is appealing to Japanese people. However, the Trick-or-Treating aspect of Halloween is not so appealing and will most likely not gain popularity in the country. Why? Because of their culture.  It is important in Japanese society avoid being a bother or pain to someone else.  Having to go around collecting candy from others is viewed as too much of an inconvenience to many people and is therefore discouraged. Halloween is mainly centered around dressing up and partying, which can be seen by the large masses of costumed people flooding the streets of Tokyo and the city's Shibuya district. 

In France, Halloween is known as an American holiday and is not celebrated for any other reason than to dress up and have a party. Halloween has been adopted by the French in recent years and is popular due to French's love for fêtes and costumes. Notable Halloween celebrations in France occur in the town of Limoges, where there is a Parade of Ghosts and Ghouls every year and at the Breakfast in America Diner in Paris. The French typically wear traditionally scary costumes - like witches, mummies or ghosts- rather than cute costumes - like superheroes, princesses, or celebrities. 

Germany celebrates Halloween as All Saints Day from October 30th to November 8th. All Saints Day is spent attending church, honoring the saints who have died for the Catholic faith, and visiting and remembering dead family members. It is also the tradition for Germans to hide their knives on All Saints Day, so the returning spirits won't be harmed by random knife movements during the day. Germans have also adopted American style traditions of Halloween and many people wear costumes and partake in celebrations at night. Trick or Treating is not very popular and it is only in the metropolitan cities of Germany that you will see groups of children actually go door-to-door saying either Süßes oder Saures or Süßes, sonst gibt's Saure (Trick or Treat) as they collect treats from their neighbors. This is partly due to the fact that  just eleven days later it is the tradition of children to go door to door on St Martinstag with their lanterns. They sing a song and then they are rewarded with baked goods and sweets.

Happy Boston Cream Pie Day!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 18, 2016

This Sunday (October 23rd) is National Boston Cream Pie Day, and what better way to celebrate than by enjoying this tasty dessert in the city where it was created. Fun fact: Boston cream pie has been distinguished as the official dessert of Massachusetts over Toll House Cookies and Fig Newton.  The first Boston Cream Pie originated at the Omni Parker House in downtown. The first Boston Cream Pie was originally called the Parker house "Chocolate Cream Pie" and was created and served at Parker's Restaurant from the opening of the hotel in October 1856. One of the reasons the dessert became so popular (so popular that it was turned into a Betty Crocker Boxed Mix in the 1990s) was the unique use of chocolate icing. When the restaurant opened chocolate was mainly consumed at home as a beverage or in puddings, so the use of chocolate on the cream pie was a big deal. The original Boston Cream Pie recipe is still served at Omni Parker House today, and you can even try your luck at recreating at home, by following the recipe here


Another fun fact: Boston Cream Pie isn't actually even a pie, but a two layer golden cake filled with pastry cream. For the best slice in Boston (in a way more casual setting than Parker's) you can try Mike's Pastry or Flour Bakery . Mike's serves their popular Boston Cream Pie whole or by the slice (it's also homemade - see picture above). Flour's well known take on the classic is made with coffee-soaked sponge cake instead of the traditional vanilla. There are many other ways to get your Boston Cream Pie fix this weekend..perhaps in cupcake or donut form? Here are some places you can get not-so-traditional versions of this traditional Boston treat. 

Boston Cream Pie Donut:  

Union Square Donuts has  a popular Boston Cream Pie Donut on the menu, made fresh daily in Somerville.

Boston Cream Pie Cupcake:

Try a Boston Cream Pie in cupcake form from Sweet Bakery in Back Bay. They are as delicious as they are adorable. 

Vegan Boston Cream Pie: 

If you're a vegan, don't worry there's pie for you too! Veggie Galaxy in Cambridge has a dairy-free versions of this famous dessert on their menu. You can't even taste the difference. 

Boston Cream Pie in a Jar?

The Tap Trail House on Union Street has this hipster version of  Boston Cream Pie on their dessert menu. Same flavors just way way cuter.

Boston Cream Pie a la cart (literally from a cart)

Want your Boston Cream Pie on the go? The Boston Cream Pie Company sells their dessert from a tricycle in the Seaport District. 


Fall Fun In The City

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Fall is here! There are so many different festive fall activities that you can enjoy with your visitor. From pumpkin picking to hay rides to apple cider donuts and more! Fall is a really fun season and it is easy to find low cost activities that will allow you to spend time with your visitor while immersing them in American culture. Nothing comes to mind?? We got you covered. Here is a bunch of fun things to do this fall season. Happy Autumn :)

Watch a Sporting Event!

Cheer on a Boston area team at a college or university football game! Many international students come from countries where football is either unpopular or nonexistent (or  its soccer) so taking your student to a game is great way to introduce them to an important aspect of American and Bostonian culture. College football games, such as games at Harvard or Boston College are also generally inexpensive to attend. This month, many schools have their homecoming weeks, which is a uniquely American tradition and it can be very interesting for international visitors to see the large cheering crowds of students in the stands. Don't like football? It's also Hockey and Soccer season! After all, not all schools have football teams (think: Northeastern, BU). You can buy tickets to university sporting events on each school's website! Go Crimson/ Eagles/ Huskies / Terriers!

Tickets to professional sporting events tend to be more pricey, but a fun way to get the experience of a football game without the high cost is by going to a tailgate! Tailgating before a football game is another American tradition and a really fun seasonal activity. Park at Gillette Stadium before a Pats game for the tailgate  and don't forget to bring food and drink from home (or a portable grill and cooler if you have one) ! Tailgating usually starts early so you'll be able to make it home in time to catch the start of the game on TV. For a schedule of home games click here.

Bake Seasonal Treats!

Another fun (also really low cost and easy) fall activity is baking! The whole Autumn season is basically a big excuse to eat everything pumpkin flavored (if you've been to Trader Joe's recently you'll know what I mean - pumpkin everything) and baking fall desserts is a is good (and also delicious) way to bond with your visitor and get in Autumn spirit. This article has recipes of some fall treats, but other easy items include cider donuts, caramel apples, and  pumpkin spice bread or cupcakes.

Visit a Farmers Market!

Browsing Boston farmer's markets is an enjoyable outdoor activity (that is also free). Farmer's markets can be fun for international visitors because it gives them a little insight into American culture (they see we eat things other than fast food!) as well as the local culture of Boston. Many vendors at the markets will also offer tastes of their products  - and who doesn't like to try free samples?? Union Square in Somerville, Harvard Square in Cambridge, Brookline and Haymarket in Downtown have popular farmers markets that are open through the end of October. You can see a map of farmers market sin the Boston area here. 

Tour Boston's Best Fall Foliage!

New England and the Boston area has some of the most beautiful fall foliage in the United States. You don't have to drive all the way to New Hampshire, Vermont, or Maine to see impressive fall foliage. In fact, you don't even need to leave the city. A relaxing fall activity is to take your visitors on a walking tour of Boston's foliage. Visit local parks, such as Boston Commons, The Public Gardens, The Esplanade, or various Boston neighborhoods. Outside of downtown the Arnold Arboretum near Forrest Hills station is a beautiful place to go walking. Exploring these areas with your visitor lets them admire the Autumn scenery while also sightseeing in and around Boston and having conversations with you! Take a look at some of the best locations to see colorful leaves around Boston here. View a live fall foliage map of the US here.

Your Columbus Day Weekend Schedule

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 04, 2016

Happy (almost) Columbus Day weekend! As many of you have the day off from work, this long weekend will be an excellent opportunity to explore the city and participate in the many celebrations happening in Boston. Columbus Day weekend is a lively time in Boston, full of parades, festivals, and other events - and may of them are free! If you're unsure of how you'll spend this (somewhat controversial) holiday, don't worry, here is a list of all the happenings this weekend so you can celebrate the discovery of America right! 

Friday October 7th (through Sunday October 9th): HONK! Street Music Festival 

Where: Davis Square, Somerville 

Time: Varying times 

Cost: FREE

Music appreciation meets activism at the HONK! festival in Davis square. This lively three day event draws brass bands from all over the world to Somerville in celebration of not only music, but the community as a whole. This is event is special because it is organized entirely by volunteers and is already in its tenth year. The festival begins Friday and kicks off with a lantern parade through Davis square neighborhoods followed by a band showcase. On Saturday over twenty five bands will take over Davis Square bringing live music and a dance party! On Sunday, many local community groups join the band members in a large parade from Davis Square to Harvard Square via Mass Ave. These local groups include activists working for extremely important causes such as economic justice, protecting the environment, world peace and ending racism. HONK! Also features a Day of Action, on which bands convene to play on behalf of a cause. For more information including schedule and times click here. 

Sunday, October 9th: East Boston Columbus Day Parade 

Where: East Boston

Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Cost: FREE

The Boston Columbus Day Parade is an old tradition in the North End and East Boston neighborhoods. How old?? Since 1937. The parade celebrates Christopher Columbus's expeditions to the Americas as well as Boston's Italian heritage (in case you didn't know Columbus was from Italy) and the commitment if Massachusetts military units to American freedom. In even numbered years (aka 2016) the parade begins in the Suffolk Downs parking lot in East Boston, marches down Bennington Street and ends at Maverick square near the waterfront. Where to watch? The best viewing spots are along Bennington Street (Blue Line / Maverick). Get there early to claim a good spot! 

Monday, October 10th (aka Columbus Day) : Columbus Park Fall Festival 

Time: 12:00pm - 4:00pm 

Location: Christopher Columbus Park, Boston's North End (100 Atlantic Avenue - next to the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel) 

Public Transportation: Blue Line / Aquarium T stop 

Cost: FREE

I can't think of a more appropriate place to celebrate Columbus Day than at a park named after the explorer himself. This festival, which is sponsored by many local North End and Waterfront businesses, has become an annual event for the city and Columbus Day tradition for many families in the Boston area. The festival begins with a children's parade through the park, followed by a ceremony at the Christopher Columbus statue. There will also be a lot FREE entertainment and games (i.e. magicians, storytellers, musicians) My lunchtime suggestion: Bring a blanket and grab food from one of the nearby North End Italian bakeries or pizza joints, one of the many food stalls at Faneuil Hall Marketplace, or The Boston Public Market.

Opening our Doors Day

Time: 10:00am - 4:00pm 

Where: Multiple locations around the Fenway neighborhood 

Cost: FREE

More information:  Find a complete events schedule for Boston's Fenway neighborhood here 

The Fenway Alliance is inviting Boston residents to participate in the city's biggest single day of free arts, cultural, and educational events. The special festival will feature over sixty different activities, performances, tours, music shows, and games (did I mention for free??) Festivities will begin on the Mass Ave side of the Christian Science Plaza at the intersection of Huntington and Mass Ave with a kids parade (featuring a brass band), many performances, and...FREE CUPCAKES!! Also, as an added plus the event includes free admission into several Fenway museums (think: Museum of Fine Arts, Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum and the Mary Baker Eddy Library Mapparium)

Find more fun things to do this weekend in Boston here and on our facebok page

A Fluff Piece On Fluff

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Last Saturday was the annual "What the Fluff?" festival in Somerville. If you're a New Englander than you probably know what fluff is (think: that marshmallowy sticky spread you can only get in this part of the country) and if you're an international visitor you're probably thinking what the fluff is fluff?!? I always found it amusing to ask non-U.S residents if they know what fluff is and then have them look back at me with a blank stare. If you've never eaten fluff before do yourself a favor : go out, buy some, and eat it on bread with peanut butter (aka a fluffernutter sandwich). You can thank me later.

So why does Somerville even have a festival to celebrate a marshmallow spread? Good question. It's because in 1917 a guy named Archibald Query invented fluff right there in Union Square. Every year the city hosts a festival, complete with musical performances, games, and street vendors, to celebrate this creation.

The festival this year, themed "Fluff U: A Sweet Education" included events like fluff covered musical chairs, fluff jousting, a fluff inspired cooking competition (during which winners were given honorary degrees from the Somerville Mayor, Joe Curtatone) and more. The festival was even MCed by an Archibald Query impersonator. Basically, the whole thing is an big excuse to have fun, be weird, and eat a lot of fluff (what more could you want in an event??)

If you couldn't make the festival this year, MC (fake) Archibald Query made it known that next year is the 100th anniversary of the creation of fluff and therefore the festival will be an even bigger celebration. So big that planning for the festival will begin as early as next month. So save the date! And maybe think up some creative fluff baking ideas...

For other quirky state food fairs check out this article from National Geographic travel!

Krazy for KitKats

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, September 27, 2016

I'm assuming you're familiar with the KitKat -- the milk chocolate and wafer bar you can find in just about every supermarket, gas station, and convenience store in the country. KitKat is definitely a popular chocolate in the U.S. but did you know that it is HUGE is Japan?? I had no idea until I read this article from CNN. The article is about the KitKat craze and why this chocolate is so popular in the country (it's a really interesting article so you should read it) We were so intrigued that we asked our Japanese culture consultant to give us some insight into this aspect of Japanese life.

To understand the KitKat craze in Japan it is important to understand the involvement of lucky charms in the culture. Belief in good luck charms and trinkets is strong in Japanese society. Japanese often keep a lucky charm, such as a coin, on their person during exams or important events so that they may have good fortune. KitKats became so popular because they are given as good luck charms. Why? Sort of by an unintentional coincidence. The candy's name sounds very similar to the Japanese phrase "kitto katsato", meaning "to surely win". Japanese students will receive KitKats from their parents or friends before exams as a way of saying good luck. Just how popular are KitKats?? In Japan they are sold in over 300 flavors - though not the kinds of flavors you would find in the U.S. Some notable KitKats include pumpkin pudding, green tea, shinshu apple, adzuki bean sandwhich. matcha, wasabi, purple sweet potatoes, cherry blossom, and sake (and to think I thought the white chocolate kind was adventurous). The reason for so many flavors is because of the large amount of competition within the Japanese candy business. Over 2,000 new confectionery products are released in the country each year, so KitKat must create new flavors to keep up. Colors also play a role in the creation of new flavors, as Japanese tend to prefer bright hues to ordinary ones. The different colored KitKats are more attractive to Japanese consumers than standard chocolates. KitKat in Japan goes beyond your standard chocolate bar, with products like KitKat pizza and "baking bars" designed to be cooked before eating. Since 2012m KitKat has begun to overtake major candy companies like Meji. 

KitKats are produced and displayed in Japan the way you might imagine gourmet chocolate is made here. In Japan, KitKats are sold in large stores, the way Lindt or Godiva chocolate is sold in the United States. However, despite their "gourmet" preparation, KitKats are still not viewed to be as fancy or classy like gourmet chocolate brands in America would be. For example, while it may be culturally appropriate in the U.S. to give a box of Godiva chocolates as say a housewarming gift or as an end of the year thank you to a professor, it would not be appropriate in Japan to give a KitKat as a gift in these same situations. So give a KitKat to your Japanese students before their test, but don't expect any from their parents if they come to visit. 

Did this post give you a KitKat craving?? Lucy for you, you don't have to go all the way to Japan for Matcha flavored KitKats. You can find them at most H Marts or Asian grocery stores. 

Autumn Colors Around The World

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, September 12, 2016

This month marks the beginning of the Autumn season in Boston. Soon the leaves will change and the air will become colder..even though it was 90 degrees and humid last week (gotta love that New England weather, right?) For me, fall is a season I really enjoy because of things like the excitement of going back to school, upcoming fall festivals, events for Halloween, and of course the beautiful way the trees look when I'm walking around the city.

Thinking about the changing seasons has me wondering what the fall season looks like in other parts of the world ( I've experienced fall abroad before, but I was in Greece and its basically hot there until December) I read an article on Lonley Planet about the world's best places to see Autumn colors and found that many countries also have New England-esque fall foliage.  Here are some highlights. 

Fall in Japan is just as pretty as the spring. Kouyou or Autumn leaves can be seen coloring the whole country, staring in the North and spreading to the South in September. The above photo is from the ancient capital of Nara, where its historical shrines are surrounded by leaves in an array of colors. 

The landscape of Scotland offers some of the finest Autumn scenes in Europe. According to the article, the best place to experience these Autumn hues is Pitlochry, which also hosts an Enchanted Forest each October where the trees are lit up and music is played as residents explore the woods around town.  

Huangshan, or Yellow Mountain, is, according to Lonley Planet, arguably the best place in China for getting the full Autumn effect. The trees covering the mountain turn a bright red throughout October drawing in thousands of tourists from other parts of the country. The foliage is particularly beautiful at sunrise.  

It's no surprise that New England made the list, after all there are so many different destinations (and all equally beautiful in the Fall) to choose from. The New England location that the article decided was the best place in the area (and in the world) to experience Aumtumn was New Hampshire's White Mountains. A hike through the hills in October will surround you with bright red maple leaves and a drive to Silver Casacde Falls in Carroll Country provides a stunning view of the trees next to a gorgeous waterfall. 

If you are looking for ways to experience Fall close to home, we provided a few destinations in last weeks blog post. You can also check out our Facebook page to see what seasonal activities are happening around Boston! 

How Do You Like Them Apples!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 07, 2016

The Autumn season is a great time in Boston to be out doors and admire one of the most beautiful seasons in Massachusetts. A fun activity this time of year is visiting farms around Boston for apple picking, pumpkin picking, hay rides, corn mazes and more...because (although it is delicious) pumpkin spice iced coffee isn't the only way to experience Fall. So put on your best flannel and enjoy the finest foliage (and cider donuts)  that New England has to offer. 

Boston Hill Farm, North Andover MA

Boston Hill Farm is a PYO orchard and farm stand located thirty minutes from the city in the quaint suburb of North Andover. The farm is open for berry picking in the summer and pumpkin and apple picking in the fall. Beginning in mid September through October the Farm hosts Apple Festivals every Saturday and Sunday and offers pumpkin picking until Halloween.  After you've decided on the perfect future Jack o' Lantern you can visit the farm stand for homemade treats like honey, jelly, fudge, and ice cream. 

Connors Farm, Danvers MA

When I looked at the map of Connors Farm is reminded me of an amusement park. There aren't roller coasters or anything like that but it definitely has more entertainment attractions that your average little red barn. In addition to apple picking and a fresh farm stand, Connors Farm is famous for their Giant Corn Maze which opens this year on September 10th - and this year its Charlie Brown themed. During October they open the Hysteria Scream Park (think: Giant Corn Maze but scary) in celebration of Halloween. Like I said before, there's no roller coasters, but there is rides! Hay rides that is....you can take one around the whole farm!

Russell Orchards, Ipswich MA

Russell Orchards might be well known for their apple picking, but the best part about the farm (in my opinion) is definitely their cider donuts. They are well worth the drive from Boston and are freshly made at the store everyday. Actually, one of the things that makes the Orchard's store so special is that everything is made fresh and all of the produce they see is grown right there on the farm. Right now, the store also features produce, honey, and eggs. My other favorite part about Russell Orchards is the animals :) You can visit all of the barnyard animals and even feed them too. If you don't visit for the cider donuts at least come for the bunnies. 

Labor Day Weekend!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, August 29, 2016

Next Monday, September 5th, is Labor Day in the U.S. You may only know Labor Day as that Monday in September where you don't have to work, or if you're a student, it's that day in the beginning of the school year when you don't have class. But what does Labor Day really mean? Why do we have this holiday?

Labor Day is a public holiday that honors the American Labor movement and celebrates the contributions that workers have made to better the country. Labor Day has its origins in the labor union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement, which advocated eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest.

For many countries, Labor Day is synonymous with, International Workers' Day, which occurs on May 1st (you might also know this as May Day). For other countries, Labor Day is celebrated on a different date, often one with special significance for the labor movement in that country. (hint: ask you visitor about Labor Day celebrations in their country)

Labor Day in Canada and the United States is also considered the unofficial end of Summer (*sad face* ) as it is celebrated on the first Monday of September during the time summer vacations are ending and students are returning to school. 

What can you do to celebrate Labor day? When the it was first created, The form for the celebration of Labor Day was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday: "A street parade to exhibit to the public the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations, followed by a festival for the workers and their families". Since then, A festival or parade has remained the basis for a proper Labor Day celebration, though with some changes made over time. Now, we see Labor Day filled with fire work displays, last trips to the beach, outdoor BBQs, and, of course, $ales. If you're looking for ways to spend you Labor Day this year, consider taking part in these events around Boston: 

Labor Day Fireworks over Boston Harbor-

Fire works launched from barges anchored off the North End and Seaport will illuminate the sky over Boston Harbor in celebration of Labor Day and the beginning of fall. The show begins at 9pm on Saturday, September 3rd. 

Where to watch: The best place to see the display is from the lawn along Christopher Columbus Park or by Long Wharf in the North End. The fireworks can also be easily seen from the South Boston Waterfront (especially around Fan Pier/ Seaport), the downtown waterfront, and Piers Park in East Boston

Labor Day Sales- 

Do some back to school shopping or revamp your fall wardrobe with Labor Day Sales throughout the city. The best places to shop? You can take advantage of reductions on already discounted prices at places like Assembly Row or Wrentham Village. If you're looking to stay in the city to shop, check out sales at Faneuil Hall, the Prudential Center, or shops around Downtown Crossing. 

For more Labor Day activity ideas click here. Enjoy the long weekend with your visitors!! 


Little Italy's Big Feast

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, August 24, 2016

This Friday marks the start of the three day festival, Saint Anthony's Feast, in the North End. As you might know, the North End has feasts and festivals all summer long, but Saint Anthony's is definietly the biggest and also happens to be a personal favorite of mine. Last year I attended the feast with my family and celebrated my (37.5%) Italian-ness by eating a cannoli on Endicott street. Even if you aren't Italian, or a canoli -lover like me you'll definitely still enjoy the festival - but come on, who doesn't love cannolis??

The Feast is a very lively event, drawing huge crowds that cover the historic streets of the North End. Hundreds of food vendors line the sidewalks serving every Italian plate you could think of; from caprese salads, to sausages, to lasagna, to aranchini. Pizza, calzones, calamari, ceci, torrone, cookies, pastries, and more.  National Geographic wasn't kidding when they called it "The Feast of all Feasts". Once you're full of Italian cooking you can stroll the streets listening to live musical performances or watch the giant statue of Saint Anthony be carried through the streets in an even giant-er parade. Experience food and beverage tastings, dancing, games, and crafts for kids. 

The best part about the celebration is that a lot of North end restaurants that are typically crowded (think: Mikes Pasteries, Pizzeria Regina) have stands where you can get their famous food without waiting in an endless line. Did you say Mike's Pastries without a line??? I know right, unheard of. 

I also really like going to The Feast because the atmosphere is so upbeat and the crowd is so fun. Even though I'm only like (almost) half Italian, its nice to be around a group of people who are all part of a similar history and are celebrating a common heritage. Above everything, I enjoy being surrounded by others who share my love of c̶a̶r̶b̶s̶ ̶ Italian food. So, if this post has convinced you to go, then the only remaining tough choice is deciding what to eat. 

For a full schedule of the weekends events and a brief history of Saint Anthony's Feast click here.